Betting on Hope title
Winter 2020
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BY WAY OF BUCKNELL
WINTER WHITE
The University Observatory stands tall as snow dusts the campus.
If you would like a reprint of this photo, please fill out the form at bucknell.edu/bmagazine. We will send you a complimentary 8-by-10 print.
photograph by Emily Paine
BY WAY OF BUCKNELL
WINTER WHITE
The University Observatory stands tall as snow dusts the campus.
If you would like a reprint of this photo, please fill out the form at bucknell.edu/bmagazine. We will send you a complimentary 8-by-10 print.
photograph by Emily Paine
Pathways
Pathways: From Bucknell to Americorps

by Susan Lindt

After graduating with majors in anthropology and Spanish, Maren Burling ’19 committed 11 months’ service to AmeriCorps, a national program similar to the Peace Corps. Burling loves children, so her assignment in a bilingual school in a mostly Hispanic Washington, D.C., neighborhood suits her. “I’m a mix of teacher’s aide and social worker, and my entire class is taught in Spanish,” she says.

Burling volunteered with children in the U.S. and Spanish-speaking countries during high school and later through Bucknell’s Office of Civic Engagement. She designed her AmeriCorps service to learn more about Hispanic culture in the United States.

With an eye on foreign service, Burling will soon start a master’s in intercultural and international communication at American University’s School of International Service. By design, she survives on food stamps, a stipend of about $285 a week and wages from her weekend job. She wants to know the challenges of the families she serves.

“I care about my work; I want to see it from a minimalist, on-the-ground point of view,” she says. “If there’s any time to do what I’m doing, it’s now.”

photograph by Lisa Helfert
Pathways
Pathways: Maren Burling '19
Pathways: From Bucknell to Americorps
by Susan Lindt
After graduating with majors in anthropology and Spanish, Maren Burling ’19 committed 11 months’ service to AmeriCorps, a national program similar to the Peace Corps. Burling loves children, so her assignment in a bilingual school in a mostly Hispanic Washington, D.C., neighborhood suits her. “I’m a mix of teacher’s aide and social worker, and my entire class is taught in Spanish,” she says.

Burling volunteered with children in the U.S. and Spanish-speaking countries during high school and later through Bucknell’s Office of Civic Engagement. She designed her AmeriCorps service to learn more about Hispanic culture in the United States.

With an eye on foreign service, Burling will soon start a master’s in intercultural and international communication at American University’s School of International Service. By design, she survives on food stamps, a stipend of about $285 a week and wages from her weekend job. She wants to know the challenges of the families she serves.

“I care about my work; I want to see it from a minimalist, on-the-ground point of view,” she says. “If there’s any time to do what I’m doing, it’s now.”

photograph by Lisa Helfert
Gateway
Letters
MEMORIES REVIVED: I greatly enjoyed reading the Wayfarer column in the Fall 2019 issue. The piece by Randolph “Randy” Osman ’64 brought back many memories of my time at Bucknell in that époque. I have wondered whatever became of Professor Joe Guerinot. I am sorry that he is no longer with us but glad that he spent his last years in France, a place that he loved.
Alice Hooker ’77
Canandaigua, N.Y.
A Different View on Ecology
I was dismayed when I read Douglas Burns ’77’s letter in relation to Bucknell’s environmental and sustainability initiatives in the Fall 2019 issue.

Mr. Burns said that “no consequential discussion of ecology can occur without serious consideration of population growth.”

This reminded me of the famous and discredited book, The Population Bomb, published in 1968 by Paul Ehrlich. This sensational and alarmist book warned of the perils of “overpopulation,” predicting worldwide famine, death, societal upheaval and devastating environmental deterioration within 20 years.

The espoused Malthusian Theory of Population, predicting exponential population growth and arithmetic food supply growth, proved to be fundamentally flawed. The theory was not only wrong but also resulted in horrific violations of human and natural rights that disproportionately harmed the poor and developing nations.

Tragically, the radical overpopulation “solutions” promoted abortion, euthanasia and forced sterilization around the world. Hopefully, we should learn an important lesson. Anti-human themes should have no place in modern ecology and environmentalism.

John Clegg P’17
Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.
Recalling a ‘Bisons’ Protest
THANK YOU for the article about our Bucky Bison in the Summer 2019 issue. It brought back a lot of fine memories.

I read with particular interest the story “How the Bison Lost Their ‘S.’ ” As a member of the Bucknell Marching Bison Band, I remember well the consternation a section of us had about the grammar of a university of our caliber using “Bisons” as a mascot name. Due to the instigation of trombonist Paul Schneeloch ’87, many of us crossed out the S on our uniforms, which were glorious, double-knit polyester from the earlier decade when Bisons was in vogue. Participating in the Marching Bison Band as a flag-squad member is a favorite part of my fond memories of my Bucknell years. It is nice to know that, though I think we were wholly unaware of Brad Tufts’ initiative, the marching band supported the name change in our own way at the home games in those same years!

On a side note, thank you also for the photo of “our” 1985 Bucky. Those of us who know Bucky personally can tell you that in 1985–87, Bucky was a nearly undefeated foosball player, a gentleman and a scholar.

Kathy Heinrich ’88
Nags Head, N.C.
Editor’s Letter
High Hopes
During the gray days of winter, when the landscape seems drained of life, it’s sometimes hard to put on a smile (and a coat) and trudge out into the cold.

We intend to banish the grays with this issue of Bucknell Magazine, our first as we enter a new decade. We decided to center this issue on a common theme, hope. And we hope that reading our cover story about alumni who have braved the gravest challenges and moved with new strength into a more hopeful future will help you view your own obstacles in a new light. In another feature, eight faculty and student essayists offer differing perspectives on where we can find hope in 2020. And, finally, the hope that Bucknell extended to two Japanese American students during World War II, freeing them from a desert detention camp to a new life in green central Pennsylvania, should make the winter grays go away.

Let us know if this look at hope resonates with you.

Sherri Kimmel
Editor
For questions or comments, contact me at sherri.kimmel@bucknell.edu
Letters Policy
Bucknell Magazine welcomes letters to the editor addressing topics covered in the magazine. Although criticism of the University and its policies is acceptable, no letters containing potentially libelous statements or personal attacks will be printed.

The editors reserve the final decision to publish and edit any letter — there is no guarantee that all letters received will be published.

All letters must be signed. The maximum length is 300 words. The editors reserve the right to edit letters for clarity and space. Writers may be asked to submit revised versions of letters or to approve editorial changes made by the Bucknell Magazine editor. After two issues, the debate on any topic will conclude. Views expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors or the official views or policies of the University.

Table of Contents
You can own this snowy photo.
From Bucknell to Americorps and Vancouver to Bucknell.
GATEWAY
Our readers share their thoughts.
High hopes for 2020.
Research team discovers potentially harmful chemical reactions.
In Lewisburg and far afield, Bucknell’s students and staff make a positive and palpable difference.
Mentoring program helps first-year students settle in.
Professor Katsuyuki Wakabayashi reveals his faves.
Gail Glover is the new vice president.
Lawrence Casey ’61 is a competitive dancer.
Professor Erica Delsandro explores the history of sexuality.
Basketball’s Ellie Mack ’20 is set for her senior season.
Civic Engagement’s Lynn Pierson explains how to motivate volunteers.
Rachel Sherbill ’09 helps create Disney’s new Star Wars theme park.
Serial entrepreneur Marc Lore ’93 of Walmart eCommerce shares his journey.
FEATURES
Alumni find hope amidst difficulty.
Faculty and a student offer reflections on hope for a new year.
Bucknell offered freedom to Japanese American students during WWII.
’RAY BUCKNELL
Navigating a stormy new era, with confidence.
Susan Mitchell Scott ’68 reflects on a life of faith.
Lynn Duryea ’69 sculpts a career as an artist.
Bernadette Pergrin Marriott ’70 studies healthy eating.
Farm-brewed beer draws Phil Lohr ’81 to career as a brewmaster.
Teresita Batayola M’88 excels in diverse public service.
Laura Rittmeyer Jenkins ’88 guides patients through difficult times.
Social entrepreneur Richard Johnson ’84 helps a small town.
Bucknellians work to help the environment.
Katie Pfeifer ’05 helps unlikely volunteers do service work.
Josephine ‘Joy’ Vargas ’13 leads a dental team for the Navy.
Remember your friends, family, classmates and others.
Nigel Robinson ’14 advances on his path to diplomatic service.
Alumni, family and friends gathered Oct. 4–6.
Your opportunities to get involved.
Drew Hopkins ’20 lights up.
ON THE COVER:
After a nearly fatal accident, Matthew Wetschler ’02 paints his way to recovery.

Photograph by Saroyan Humphrey

Bucknell
magazine

Volume 13, Issue 1

Interim Chief Communications Officer
Heather Johns

Editor
Sherri Kimmel

Design
Amy Wells

Associate Editor
Matt Hughes

class notes editor
Heidi Hormel

Contributors
Brad Tufts
Emily Paine
Susan Lindt
Bryan Wendell
Mike Ferlazzo

Editorial Assistants
Shana Ebright
Julia Stevens ’20

Website
bucknell.edu/bmagazine

Contact
Email: bmagazine@bucknell.edu
Class Notes:
classnotes@bucknell.edu
Telephone: 570-577-3611

Bucknell Magazine
(ISSN 1044-7563), of which this is volume 13, number 1, is published in winter, spring, summer and fall by Bucknell University, One Dent Drive, Lewisburg, PA 17837. Periodicals Postage paid at Lewisburg, PA and additional mailing offices.
Permit No. 068-880.

Circulation
53,000

Postmaster
Send all address changes to:
Office of Records,
301 Market St., Suite 2
Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837
© 2020 Bucknell University
Please recycle after use.

Mix Paper from responsible sources
Jewel Cook '20 (left) and Ana Islas '20 connect an e-cigarette to a testing apparatus.
Photo: Emily Paine
Jewel Cook ’20 (left) and Ana Islas ’20 connect an e-cigarette to a testing apparatus.
Unlocking the Hazards of Vaping
Research team discovers potentially harmful chemical reactions
by Mike Ferlazzo
A team of Bucknell researchers may be the first to discover a dangerous chemical reaction that can produce carbon monoxide when e-cigarettes are used on higher power settings.

The dangers of vaping and e-cigarettes briefly claimed headlines in fall 2019, when more than 40 deaths and 2,000 cases of serious lung ailments were linked to vaping.

“We’re the first to show the relationship with carbon monoxide as a function of the power of the e-cigarette,” says Professor Dabrina Dutcher, chemical engineering and chemistry, who began studying e-cigarettes with students three years ago. “The study proves that we really don’t know what’s coming out of e-cigarettes, but we now know there are potentially harmful chemical reactions.”

news ticker
REMEMBERING CARMEN
President John Bravman affirmed the enduring mission of the Griot Institute for the Study of Black Lives & Cultures in the absence of its late founder, Professor Carmen Gillespie. The director’s position is now called the Carmen Gillespie Director, and funding will now come from the University’s base budget.
EAVESDROPPING ON ANTS
Professor Greg Pask, biology, received a two-year research grant from the Charles E. Kaufman Foundation for his study on ants’ ability to smell social cues. Students will participate in the project, potentially leading to advances in both agriculture and human health.
SELF-DRIVING CAR SAFETY
Professor Craig Beal, mechanical engineering, is part of a research team awarded a $1.2 million National Science Foundation for collaborative research on safety systems for autonomous vehicles. Students from Bucknell, Penn State and the University of Massachusetts will help with the research.
AROUND TOWN AND AROUND THE GLOBE
’burg and Beyond
In Lewisburg and far afield, Bucknell’s students and staff make a positive and palpable difference.
Matt Rulon and Matt Sennett leading SBDC's most ambitious project into product development
Photo: Emily Paine
" "
The project led by Matt Rulon (left) and Matt Sennett is the SBDC”s most ambitious foray into product development, says Director Steven Stumbris.

" "New Berlin, Pa.
Late last summer, on Lake Hopatcong, N.J., Matt Rulon ’21 went wakeboarding for the first time. He managed to stand on the board — a tall order for a beginner — but the more experienced riders with him weren’t so satisfied. The wakeboard they rode was too stiff and too heavy for a quality ride. Rulon’s mission for the next year was to make it better.

What They’re Doing
Supported by a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, Rulon and fellow mechanical engineering major Matt Sennett ’21 are helping snowboard manufacturer Gilson Snow expand its product line into wakeboards. The students are manufacturing innovation fellows with Bucknell’s Small Business Development Center (SBDC). With support from mechanical engineering professors Nate Siegel and Craig Beal, they’re creating prototypes at the company’s New Berlin, Pa., factory and testing them with equipment at the College of Engineering.

It’s the T.E.A.M. that Counts
Mentoring program helps first-year students settle in
by Patrick Broadwater
Many students struggle with moving away from home for the first time and acclimating to college. The T.E.A.M. (Together Everyone Achieves More) peer mentoring program helps combat the particular challenges of students from underrepresented backgrounds and ease their transition to Bucknell.

The program partners first-year student scholars from more urban and ethnically diverse areas with seasoned students who, as peer mentors, offer support and resources to assist new students in navigating life on campus and in rural Lewisburg.

“Bucknell is quite a change for some students,” says Rosalie Rodriguez, director of Multicultural Student Services. “Even those who grew up in predominately white areas were still able to go home to their families at night and have their culture and heritage reaffirmed. Although our under-represented minority population has grown, students potentially can still be the only person of color in their residence hall, on their sports team or in their classes. They don’t get that affirmation of their personhood, culture or value system mirrored back to them as often as other students might.”

New Leader Joins Communications
by Matt Hughes
This month, Gail Glover joined Bucknell as vice president for communications. Glover brings 25 years of experience in higher-ed marketing and communications in the public and private sectors, from large state universities to smaller colleges that, like Bucknell, offer a rich mix of liberal arts and professional programs.

“I’m thrilled at the prospect of working with a talented team that has done a wonderful job of laying the groundwork of a communications approach that is similarly strategic and thoughtful,” Glover says.

Glover comes to Bucknell from the State University of New York at Geneseo in western New York, where she was chief communications and marketing officer overseeing a rebranding campaign that included the design and rollout of a new university logo and parent communication strategy.

Clip art of Katsuyuki Wakabayashi, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering
Katsuyuki Wakabayashi
Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering & Co-Director, Residential Colleges Program
What I'm Reading Logo for Bucknell Magazine
Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, Susan Cain
A graduating senior gave me this book. Susan Cain, a self-claimed introvert, convinces us that introverts can thrive in the world that seems to be dominated by loud extroverts. This book challenges us to rethink what it truly means to be a model Bucknellian, making it a pertinent read as Bucknell welcomes diversity and experiences a shift in student demographics and backgrounds.
Cover of I Love Capitalism: An American Story by Ken Langone
I Love Capitalism: An American Story, Ken Langone ’57, P’83
A student recommended this book to me. I was intrigued to take a deep dive into the life of one of our most illustrious alumni, whose drive, guts, instincts and care for others is awe-inspiring. This captivating memoir also reminds us that we can create our own definition of success and achieve it by working hard and cherishing relationships.
Cover of Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived by Joyful Life, Bill Burnett and Dave Evans
Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life, Bill Burnett and Dave Evans
A colleague gifted me this book when I sought advice for my mid-career struggles. Using the framework of engineering design, the authors help readers craft — and act on — the best versions of themselves. The book is great not only for career and professional development, but also for reviewing one’s life choices and happiness.
What I'm Reading Logo for Bucknell Magazine
Clip art of Katsuyuki Wakabayashi, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering
Katsuyuki Wakabayashi
Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering & Co-Director, Residential Colleges Program
Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, Susan Cain
A graduating senior gave me this book. Susan Cain, a self-claimed introvert, convinces us that introverts can thrive in the world that seems to be dominated by loud extroverts. This book challenges us to rethink what it truly means to be a model Bucknellian, making it a pertinent read as Bucknell welcomes diversity and experiences a shift in student demographics and backgrounds.
Cover of I Love Capitalism: An American Story by Ken Langone
I Love Capitalism: An American Story, Ken Langone ’57, P’83
A student recommended this book to me. I was intrigued to take a deep dive into the life of one of our most illustrious alumni, whose drive, guts, instincts and care for others is awe-inspiring. This captivating memoir also reminds us that we can create our own definition of success and achieve it by working hard and cherishing relationships.
Cover of Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived by Joyful Life, Bill Burnett and Dave Evans
Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life, Bill Burnett and Dave Evans
A colleague gifted me this book when I sought advice for my mid-career struggles. Using the framework of engineering design, the authors help readers craft — and act on — the best versions of themselves. The book is great not only for career and professional development, but also for reviewing one’s life choices and happiness.
Pop Quiz
Lawrence
Casey ’61
Competitive Country Western and International Latin dance champion

Retired ExxonMobil engineer Lawrence Casey first signed up for dance lessons to learn a few casual moves he could try at country-western clubs. He began pairing with a professional dancer and has won Country Western Pro-Am championships around the globe. Now he mainly competes in International Latin and has been known to do the two-step at the supermarket.

One
What’s your favorite competition category?
 
a. Texas Two-Step
b. Cha-Cha
c. Waltz
Two
Who would be your dream dance partner from the country-western music world?
a. Dolly Parton
b. Emmylou Harris
c. Miranda Lambert
I guess I’m traditional, and Emmylou Harris seems like the most classic country performer.
4. What’s the best part of competitive dancing?
 
a. Having an excuse to wear a cowboy hat
b. Getting to travel to competitions around the world
c. The applause
When you’re competing, there could be as many as a dozen couples on the dance floor. So you’re trying to get the judge’s attention. If you get a bunch of applause for your performance, then the judge is going to look over, and hopefully you’re doing something good.
Five
What aspect of your résumé has most helped you with dance?
 
a. Serving in the military
(including 28 years in the Army Reserves)

b. Being a rancher in Texas
c. Studying chemical engineering at Bucknell
Cool Class clipart
Hand Laying down dice
History of Sexuality
What Class?
History of Sexuality
Who Teaches It?
Professor Erica Delsandro, women’s & gender studies
“This class is important for students who are interested in gender, sexuality, race, politics and power, because it historicizes and denaturalizes concepts such as sex and sexuality, which are made to appear stable, universal, essential and singular. Being able to relearn sex and sexuality through social constructionist and intersectional lenses reveals the way in which social forces — including economics, politics, science and philosophy — shape and shift our understandings of the sexed body, sexual interaction and sexual identity.

“The class is an eclectic mix of material, which I consider a strength. We read fiction, autobiography, philosophy, history and criticism. We look at images from the past and present. And we do so through an intersectional framework, which means we always consider sex and sexuality in conjunction with gender, race, class and other identity vectors. Each week, students write short responses to the material we read and discuss, and they share their thoughts with the class. The next week, the new responses must incorporate the new readings and include references to students’ analyses from the week before. In this manner, we are producing a shared class text. We are all engaged in the process of discovery and knowledge creation. It’s super cool!

Loving the Challenge: Ellie Mack ’20
Photo: Marc Hagemeier
" "
Ellie Mack ’20 makes a drive against Florida State during last spring’s NCAA Tournament.
Loving the Challenge
by Andrew Faught
Six weeks before Ellie Mack ’20 arrived at Bucknell as a lauded basketball recruit, excitement gave way to a painful reality.

The 6-foot-3-inch forward from Paoli, Pa., was competing in a high school all-star game when she stole the ball and broke for the other team’s basket. En route, she stepped on another player’s foot, which wrenched her ankle and caused an audible “pop” in her left knee.

“My knee felt loose, and I didn’t have control over my motor movements,” Mack recalls. “I remember lying on the gym floor staring at the ceiling. The first thing I said was, ‘I just tore my ACL.’ ”

The anterior cruciate ligament helps stabilize the knee joint. Recovery is a months-long process that forced Mack to sit out her first season. She said rehabilitation was an “extremely difficult” time, during which she occasionally worried whether her skills would return.

How to Motivate Volunteers
Illustration of Lynn Pierson
Illustration: Joel Kimmel

" "Lynn Pierson knows volunteers. As assistant director of community service in the Office of Civic Engagement, she and her team annually manage hundreds of volunteers and their projects here and abroad. She matches volunteers with projects that stoke their enthusiasm, and matches organizations’ needs to the volunteers who can fulfill them. She’s responsible for keeping things on track so that even when chaos reigns, her volunteers are working toward their shared goal.

Galactic Engineering
Out of This World
With Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, Rachel Sherbill ’09 transports fans into their favorite franchise.
by Bryan Wendell
I

nstead of “good morning,” a villager greets you by saying, “bright suns.” The nearest bathroom? That query gets you a blank stare, but you’re told the closest “refresher” is just past the Toydarian Toymaker shop. And — wait a parsec — is that person drinking blue milk?

Clearly, you stepped out of the traditional theme-park experience and into a galaxy far, far away.

At Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, the new themed land at Disneyland Resort and Walt Disney World Resort, every element, from the life-size Millennium Falcon to the droid tread tracks in the ground, is crafted with a Jedi Master’s attention to detail.

Rachel Sherbill
The Ridgeway family of Mississippi
Photos: Disney/Lucasfilm
" "
Above: Rachel Sherbill ’09 helped create every Star Wars lover’s dream landscape. Below: The Ridgeway family of Mississippi pilots the “fastest ship in the galaxy” on Millennium Falcon: Smugglers Run, a ride at Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, Calif.
Q&A
Drawing of Marc Lore '93
Illustration: Joel Kimmel
Marc Lore ’93
Bend the Odds in Your Favor
by SHERRI KIMMEL
President and CEO of Walmart U.S. eCommerce Marc Lore ’93 is no stranger to success — or failure, which he’s not afraid to admit. It’s all part of the game for the serial entrepreneur, who founded and served as CEO of Jet.com, growing it to a $1 billion business before selling to Walmart in 2016. Before Jet.com, he started and sold two other companies. Ever the entrepreneur, Lore created an interdisciplinary major in finance as a Bucknell student.
Q: What are some of the key attributes of a successful entrepreneur?
First, you have to have a big vision and be in relentless pursuit of it. And just work so hard, 24/7. It has an impact on all of the rest of your life — it’s very hard to be a balanced entrepreneur. You’ve got to be all in. You have to not be afraid to take risks or to fail — there’s no safe way to become an entrepreneur. You have to do some things that have a low probability of success, and then work as hard as you possibly can to try to bend the odds in your favor. If you like things to be organized, it’s not going to work. You can’t organize an entrepreneurial journey; you just gotta follow the path.
Features
WORLD WAR II FINDING THEIR NICHE AT BUCKNELL
Photograph of Dorothy Sakasegawa Tabery ’48 (left) and Sachiye Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48 at Bucknell courtesy of Kiyo Tabery
Features
WORLD WAR II FINDING THEIR NICHE AT BUCKNELL
Photograph of Dorothy Sakasegawa Tabery ’48 (left) and Sachiye Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48 at Bucknell courtesy of Kiyo Tabery
Photograph of Dorothy Sakasegawa Tabery ’48 (left) and Sachiye Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48 at Bucknell courtesy of Kiyo Tabery
Features
WORLD WAR II FINDING THEIR NICHE AT BUCKNELL
Photograph of Dorothy Sakasegawa Tabery ’48 (left) and Sachiye Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48 at Bucknell courtesy of Kiyo Tabery
Photograph of Dorothy Sakasegawa Tabery ’48 (left) and Sachiye Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48 at Bucknell courtesy of Kiyo Tabery
Facing

Challenges

with

Grace
Alumni find hope amidst difficulty
by roy kesey

Photograph by Saroyan Humphrey

Matthew Wetschler ’02’s art explores the nature of struggle and persistence, reflective of his journey after a debilitating surfing accident.
Facing

Challenges

with

Grace
Alumni find hope amidst difficulty
by roy kesey

Photograph by Saroyan Humphrey

Matthew Wetschler ’02’s art explores the nature of struggle and persistence, reflective of his journey after a debilitating surfing accident.
Heraclitus has been dead for 2,500 years, but his core assertion — that change is the only constant — feels like it was built for our age. In the remaining shards of his work, the idea manifests twice in the form of water. In the words of John Burnet’s translation of Fragment 12, “You cannot step twice into the same rivers …”

This is a story about rough waters.

{I}
Take Nothing for Granted
After graduating from Bucknell with a degree in international relations and economics, George “Tony” Hewett ’76, P’23 earned a J.D. from Suffolk University Law School and began a career in politics: George H.W. Bush’s primary campaign in 1979, the Reagan/Bush general campaign, and then a series of posts culminating in special assistant to a Cabinet secretary and then president of the Government National Mortgage Association.
HOPE.
It’s the thing with feathers.
It springs eternal.
It’s a waking dream.
It’s full of immortality.
Or so the great bards tell us.
Illustrations by LILLI CARRÉ
To usher in a new decade, we asked Vice President for Strategic Initiatives Robert Midkiff and our three college deans, Raquel Alexander, Patrick Mather and Karl Voss, to recommend visionary faculty members or students who could offer some thoughts on what hope means to them.

For Amal Kabalan, hope can be found in her resilient students. Kelly Knox is inspired by the legacy of the late English Professor Carmen Gillespie. Joe Tranquillo celebrates the value of taking a timeout rather than living in perpetual “run” mode. Yasameen Mohammadi ’20 rediscovers hope after family tragedy. For Chet’la Sebree, hope resides in careful use of language. Nikki Young pins her hopes on a more inclusive, equitable and diverse Bucknell. Matt Bailey looks to analytics as a solution to time-sapping problems. And John Hunter urges us to think in new ways. I hope you enjoy their essays on the following pages.

A final word: What does hope mean to you as we move into 2020? Please share your thoughts at bmagazine@bucknell.edu or on @BucknellU social media channels.

Sherri Kimmel, editor

Hope. Illustration by Lilli Carré
HOPE.
It’s the thing with feathers.
It springs eternal.
It’s a waking dream.
It’s full of immortality.
Or so the great bards tell us.
Illustrations by LILLI CARRÉ
To usher in a new decade, we asked Vice President for Strategic Initiatives Robert Midkiff and our three college deans, Raquel Alexander, Patrick Mather and Karl Voss, to recommend visionary faculty members or students who could offer some thoughts on what hope means to them.

For Amal Kabalan, hope can be found in her resilient students. Kelly Knox is inspired by the legacy of the late English Professor Carmen Gillespie. Joe Tranquillo celebrates the value of taking a timeout rather than living in perpetual “run” mode. Yasameen Mohammadi ’20 rediscovers hope after family tragedy. For Chet’la Sebree, hope resides in careful use of language. Nikki Young pins her hopes on a more inclusive, equitable and diverse Bucknell. Matt Bailey looks to analytics as a solution to time-sapping problems. And John Hunter urges us to think in new ways. I hope you enjoy their essays on the following pages.

A final word: What does hope mean to you as we move into 2020? Please share your thoughts at bmagazine@bucknell.edu or on @BucknellU social media
channels.
Sherri Kimmel, editor

1
1
A Resilient Spirit
1
A Resilient Spirit
My belief that I can make a difference in someone’s life gives me hope for the future. In the classroom and during office hours, close interaction with my students allows me to discover their true passions. Teaching at Bucknell is a very personal process. It is not just about delivering course material, but it is also about the process of discovering the passion of each student and helping them achieve their dreams.
THE
WAY
OUT
Bucknell offered freedom to Japanese American students incarcerated during World War II
By Sherri Kimmel

Photograph by Derek Lapsley

THE
WAY
OUT
Bucknell offered freedom to Japanese American students incarcerated during World War II
By Sherri Kimmel

Photograph by Derek Lapsley

Sachiye “Sachi” Mizuki Kuwamoto
Sachiye “Sachi” Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48 outside her Clovis, Calif., home.
H

er life was suddenly interrupted when the U.S. government plucked her out of her world and sent her to a desert relocation camp. Two years later, in a twist of nearly equal proportion, her life resumed — at Bucknell University. Now age 93, she’s the only known Bucknellian alive to share her story of being detained in a Japanese American prison camp during World War II.

In the 1940s, Sachiye “Sachi” Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48 was an all-American girl living in California’s lush Central Valley. Her parents had been born in Hiroshima, Japan, but now were hard-working grape farmers in Sanger, a town known for the General Sherman, a 267-plus-foot sequoia so majestic that a 1926 act of Congress designated it a National Shrine. She was a serious student, expected to follow the customary plan of her day: graduate from high school, attend a local college, then marry.

Bucknell widened the world for Japanese American student
by Sherri Kimmel
Before arriving at Bucknell in 1944, Dorothy “Dotty” Sakasegawa Tabery ’48 led a quiet life as one of 10 children of Japanese farmers who came to Salinas, Calif., from Kagoshima in southwestern Japan. But like her future high school and Bucknell classmate, Sachiye “Sachi” Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48, Dorothy’s life was irretrievably altered by the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor in late 1941, according to her daughter, Midori Tabery.

Dorothy, who died in 2010, told Midori about her life in the camps and at Bucknell. Whereas Sachiye’s family traveled directly to the Colorado River Relocation Center in Poston when ordered to leave their home, the Sakasegawas “were first removed to the Salinas Rodeo grounds and put in horse stalls,” Midori recounts. “It was kind of like, ‘Wait a minute. We’re staying here?’ ”

Midori says the experience left the Sakasegawas conflicted as Americans. “They wanted to show that they were good, loyal American citizens — be grateful and positive by enduring what was difficult, which is a very Japanese trait.” When she became a teen, Midori pressed her mother about her reaction to incarceration. “She said that you understood that something was not right, but you had to learn to put a good face on it.”

After her mother spent her junior and senior years of high school in the Poston camp, “the opportunity to come to Bucknell was huge for her,” says Midori.

ALL FIRED UP: Homecoming was a treat for the eyes
photograph by Gordon Wenzel
From the President
Drawing of John C. Bravman, President
Illustration: Joel Kimmel
Navigating a Stormy New Era
You may have seen the news about the downturn in admissions that surprised many institutions last year, when some highly regarded schools missed their admissions target by 20 to 30% or even more. Thankfully, the impact at Bucknell has been minimal — we were less than 2% below the number of students our models predicted would enroll.

THE FOUR C’S
So what happened? I believe we can encapsulate the enrollment challenges in higher education in four words: cost, confidence, community and continuity.

Alumni Photo Gallery
Images will scroll automatically
1953
In May, Bette MacDonald Becker ’53 (right) traveled with daughter Jennifer to Tucson, Ariz., to attend grandson the graduation of Cameron LeBlanc (center) from the University of Arizona. They stayed at the home of Nancy Carter Whitney ’53 (left). Everyone enjoyed a great weekend celebrating graduation, Mother’s Day and Bette’s 88th birthday.
2002
Ted Wilson ’02 and wife Katie had their third child, Polly, Nov. 8, 2018. Pictured at Polly’s christening are, from left, godparent Michaela Serventi Davis ’04, Ted, with Polly, Katie, Teddy, and Clark Wilson and godparent Erick Davis ’01.
2002
Crystal Mendez-Covington ’02 and husband, Charles are pictured with son Charles IV “EJ,” born in 2016, and daughter, Carlisa “Carlie,” born in 2017. Crystal is an occupational therapist for children with special needs in an elementary school in Queens, N.Y.
1953
Bucknell Athletics Hall of Fame member Brad Myers ’53 was honored by the Los Angeles Rams during their August preseason game against the Dallas Cowboys at Aloha Stadium in Hawaii. He will celebrate his 90th birthday in February, making him one of the oldest living former Rams. He lives in Mākaha, Hawaii, with his wife, Nancy Smyth-Myers.
2005
Pictured from left are Brian Raves ’05, John Bednarz ’05 and John Siwicki ’05 during their biennial tour of baseball stadiums. In 2019, the trio went to Houston and Arlington, Texas, after checking off stadiums in the Midwest and Rust Belt on previous road-trip adventures. The group has visited nearly 20 parks and is planning for Florida and California baseball tours.
2008
In July, more than a dozen Bucknellians attended the wedding of Alena Beerman ’08 and Koldo Zúñiga in Getxo, Spain. Pictured are, back row from left, Kate Bender ’08, Jennie Trayes ’08, Katie Abbot ’08, Julia Rockwell ’08, Jenna Kotyk ’08, Jesse Nercessian ’08, Mike Needham ’08, Karen Chen Piuggi ’07, Ashlie Nawrocki ’08, and, front row from left, Doug Mackenzie ’08, Brittany Kaplan ’08, Alena, Nicolette Vielee ’08 and Victoria Gilbert ’08.
1977–80
On Oct. 18, Bucknell alumni and friends joined the Bucknell Club of Baltimore to watch the Bison play the Tigers at Towson University’s Homecoming. From left: Pilar Hamilton, Gloria Jackson Hicks ’77, Stacy Ross ’80 and Lisa Babin ’78.
Catch up with Bucknell alumni in pictures.

Submit your own photos to Bucknell Magazine by contacting your class reporter or emailing classnotes@bucknell.edu

wayfinder
Susan Mitchell Scott ’68

After graduating from Bucknell in 1968, my first 20 years included marriage, children and working as a children’s-music educator. But in midlife, I began paying more attention to a long-deferred call to ordained ministry. I tested this call by taking a unit of chaplaincy training at Williamsport Hospital. While learning how to provide pastoral care to folks with respiratory illnesses, I learned much about myself and my gifts for ministry. The experiential education I received in those seven months emboldened me to take a bigger plunge. In 1988, as a midlife, single mother of four, I headed off to Princeton Theological Seminary for a master of divinity degree. When I told the admissions officer that my Bucknell major had been history, he told me that a history major was excellent preparation for theological studies. Who knew?

Susan Mitchell Scott Headshot
Photo: Rachel Karnes

In the 20 years that followed seminary, I put that academic and spiritual formation to use, first as a parish pastor, then as a geriatric chaplain and, finally, as a hospice chaplain. Now, in semi-retirement, I minister part time as a spiritual director and retreat leader. I am also a newly published author of a book of 52 meditations for older adults.

PROFILE
Living Creatively
Lynn Duryea ’69 sculpts a career as an artist
by Susan Lindt

Sculptor Lynn Duryea ’69 knows commercial success — for years, Tiffany & Co. sold her hand-thrown vessels in its iconic Manhattan store. But success didn’t come easily: Along the way, she briefly worked in a sardine factory, endured the craft-show circuit and came to accept the unknown.

“To be an artist, you must be comfortable living with uncertainty,” she says. “I’m fortunate. There are compromises I’ve made to be an artist, but I never had a 9-to-5 job that made me miserable.”

Geography, as much as any grand plan, dictated Duryea’s trajectory. After majoring in history at Bucknell, Duryea started a master’s in art history and took pottery classes. Eventually, she abandoned graduate school and a starter job at the Metropolitan Museum of Art to settle on Maine’s Deer Isle, where she studied at Haystack School of Craft. She embraced the creative community, developed galleries and partnerships, exhibited internationally and won prestigious awards, taught workshops and volunteered.

“It was the first time I was around people who were living their lives creatively,” she says. “We made a family, and many of us are still there. It’s home in a really deep way.”

Lynn Duryea Headshot
Photo: Joshua White
Lynn Duryea ’69 with WRAP #2, a steel and slab-constructed terracotta sculpture, a piece which is inspired by architectural structures.
PROFILE
Keep Calm and Eat Well
Bernadette Pergrin Marriott ’70 studies up on healthy eating
by Benjamin Gleisser

Whether dealing with primates or Army privates, Bernadette Pergrin Marriott ’70 has spent most of her adult life studying how different foods and their nutritional components affect her research subjects’ health.

Her studies took her to the jungles of Nepal and Panama, where she researched how baby monkeys learn what to eat, and to the National Academy of Medicine, where she recently chaired a workshop titled Understanding and Overcoming the Challenge of Obesity and Overweight in the Armed Forces.

Advising the military on how to keep soldiers fit — educating about key nutrients and the potential perils of consuming body-building supplements with undisclosed composition — is a vital mission for Marriott, professor emerita in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology and the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina.

Bernadette Pergrin Marriott’s Headshot
Photo: Medical University of South Carolina
Bernadette Pergrin Marriott’s interest in diet and health began at Bucknell.
PROFILE
‘Live Simply. Drink Locally’
Farm-brewed beer draws Phil Lohr ’81 to new career as a brewmaster
by Alexander Diegel

When Phil Lohr ’81 graduated from Bucknell with degrees in mathematics and computer science, the chances he’d someday become a brewmaster were quite slim. Yet 38 years later, Lohr is a brewer and co-owner of Hops on the Hill, Connecticut’s only farm-to-glass brewery.

“It certainly has been an interesting journey,” Lohr says of the path that led him from Lewisburg to his small farm in South Glastonbury, Conn. While working in computer science, Lohr began hobby brewing.

“Home brewing, in the shuffle of a corporate life and raising four children, was something I did maybe a couple of times per year,” Lohr explains. “Not until the last five years or so did this vision really come alive.”

As his career transitioned to organizational development and consulting for major corporations such as Aetna, General Electric and Merck, Lohr’s passion for brewing was reinvigorated by a 2008 trip to Bavaria, Germany, where he learned to brew German-style lagers. “It’s a very old beer culture there,” he says. “The German-style beer and beer gardens are part of the lifestyle.”

Phil Lohr holding a beer.
Photo: Joel Kurlan
Phil Lohr ’81 at Hops on the Hill, where the beer is brewed in small batches, is never filtered or pasteurized and contains no preservatives, additives or stabilizers.
Flashback
Teresita Batayola Headshot
Photo: Yuen Lui Photography Studio
DIVERSE PUBLIC SERVICE

Public service has been a core value for Teresita Batayola M’88 since her studies in urban administration at Bucknell. The president and CEO of Seattle-based International Community Health Services recently was named one of the most influential Filipina women in the world by the Filipina Women’s Network.

1. How did Bucknell shape your career?

Bucknell had a brief graduate partnership with the National Urban Fellows, a program for mid-career professionals who aspire to public-sector leadership. The combination of intense seminars and a placement as an assistant to a federal department secretary refined and focused my desire to be in public service.

2. What class opened your eyes the most?

Seminars on economics with Professor Steve Stamos drove home the impact of macro and micro financial policies and actions on businesses, governments, communities, families and individuals.

PROFILE
The Gene Scene
Laura Rittmeyer Jenkins ’88 guides patients through difficult times
by Julia Stevens ’20

Genetic counselor Laura Rittmeyer Jenkins ’88 explains that when calling a patient with a new genetic diagnosis, she is quick to caution, “Do not Google this,” adding, “The internet loves the worst-case scenario, right?” To counter online information that can be overwhelming and frightening, Jenkins steers patients away from the uncurated information that can be found on the internet and provides specific online resources to help patients learn about and adjust to a new diagnosis.

Jenkins first discovered the relatively new field of genetic counseling at the wedding of Stefanie Lin ’88, P’19 during a conversation with Lin’s sister, a geneticist. Jenkins, who majored in psychology and English, soon found herself pursuing an M.S. in genetic counseling at the University of Pittsburgh. Since 2015, she has worked at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and is an adjunct instructor in human genetics at the University of Pittsburgh.

Laura Rittmeyer Jenkins Headshot
Photo: Emily Paine
Laura Rittmeyer Jenkins ’88 is drawn to genetic counseling because of the dynamicity it brings to her life.
Entrepreneur Spotlight
Richard Johnson in Burgaw, N.C
Photo: Michael Cline Spencer
Richard Johnson ’84 in Burgaw, N.C., a distressed town he is working to revive.
Burgaw Now

by Matt Zencey

When Richard Johnson ’84 was in fifth grade, he would spend his allowance on toothpicks, dip them in cinnamon oil and sell them for five cents each. By seventh grade, he was buying cases of Life Savers candy and selling individual rolls to his classmates. It was an early sign that he might do well in the business world — and he certainly did. In the late 1990s, the Bucknell political science major founded HotJobs, an early internet job search and recruiting site. It proved to be so hot that Yahoo bought the business for more than $400 million in 2002.

Selling to Yahoo made possible what Johnson calls “Life 2.0,” a long interlude when he focused on his family and sharing his marketing and management expertise with several nonprofit groups. Since 2005, he has lived along the southern coast of North Carolina, where he recently founded a community group to promote better stewardship of Masonboro Island, an undeveloped nature preserve across the water from his home that was being trashed by rowdy visitors.

Career
Clusters
Bucknell’s focus on solving environmental problems with a thoughtful consideration of humanistic, policy and social science issues prepared these graduates for environmental protection work that’s making a difference now and into the future.
A diagram of individuals and their careers in conversation, research, and regulation.
A diagram of individuals and their careers in conversation, research, and regulation.
PROFILE
Everyone Can Shine
Katie Pfeifer ’05 helps connect unlikely volunteers with community service opportunities
by Steve Neumann

“One of the things I really value about a liberal arts education is learning how to think broadly,” Katie Pfeifer ’05 says. “Under-standing how we interact with the world and how we come together and work — or don’t work — really appealed to me,” says Pfeifer, who majored in economics and international relations.

This liberal arts lens through which Pfeifer views the world led her to a career in the nonprofit sector and to Volunteer New York!, one of the oldest volunteer connector organizations in the world, now in its 71st year. Pfeifer, as the director of programs and evaluation, is at the heart of the organization, overseeing its programmatic success. The Readiness thru Integrated Service Engagement (RISE) program is one she helped start and of which she’s most proud. RISE was created to address an increase in the number of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities looking to volunteer. RISE participants build job and community skills as they assist nonprofits.

The RISE program “really helped us clarify something we all felt,” Pfeifer says. “Everyone can make an impact, and everyone can make a difference. It’s really about trying to find the right fit for each person so they can shine.”

Katie Pfeifer Painting
Photo: Paul Schneiderman
Katie Pfeifer ’05 helps restore a porch at an affordable-housing site for senior citizens in Thornwood, N.Y. Volunteer New York! partnered with A-Home Housing on the project.
PROFILE
Fixing Sailors’ Smiles
Josephine “Joy” Vargas ’13 leads the dental team for a Navy aircraft carrier
by Lori Ferguson

As a dentist on land, providing a patient with a partial denture is no big deal. When you’re out to sea on a Nimitz class aircraft carrier, however, you’ve got to get a bit creative, observes Josephine “Joy” Vargas ’13. “It’s challenging, because we have to make do with materials we have on hand, but we get it done,” she says.

A lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Dental Corps, Vargas is deployed in the Middle East aboard the 5th Fleet’s USS Abraham Lincoln. She leads a team of three dentists, an oral surgeon and 14 corpsmen treating more than 5,000 sailors.

Life aboard ship can be stressful, she concedes. “I live a mixture of dentistry and military life,” she explains. “I live in my workplace, my days are long, and we’re deployed, so the stress level in our environment is constant.”

Josephine Vargas and Jamie Noles on deploy
Photo: Richard Flynn
Josephine Vargas ’13 with her dental technician, Jamie Noles, on deployment aboard USS Abraham Lincoln outside the Straits of Gibraltar.
IN MEMORIAM
Remember your friends, family, classmates and others by posting a comment on our online Book of Remembrance.
1940
Edward Lewis, July 27, Los Angeles
1943
Muriel Heise Dykstra P’73, P’76, May 7, 2015, Southampton, Pa.
Jack Reyer, Aug. 1, Hermitage, Pa.
1944
Elizabeth “Lynn” Grosklaus Poole, July 29, Wilimington, Del.
Esther Herrington Wheeler, July 18, Pittsford, N.Y.
1945
Kathryn “Kay” Stout Bergin, Aug. 8, Pompton Lakes, N.J.
1946
Tozia Lewski Marshall, July 8, Ambler, Pa.
1947
John Arbogast G’18, Aug. 21, Lewisburg, Pa.
Helen Lupold
Deffenbaugh, Sept. 22, Muncy, Pa.
Paul Lenchuk, Aug. 15, Winter Park, Fla.
Jay Maisel, Aug. 30, Sarasota, Fla.
1949
Earle Cornelius, Sept. 12, Winfield, Pa.
Alden Dalzell, July 3, The Plains, Ohio
Nancy Bishop Douglas, Sept. 9, Urbandale, Iowa
Rita Scholato Paulosky P’75, Feb. 13, Minersville, Pa.
Emilie “Lee” Luke Schmauch P’76, Sept. 9, Topton, Pa.
1950
Suzie Smith Cheesman, Aug. 28, Rockville, Md.
Rose Robyns Coelho, May 13, 2018, Vaucresson, France
Joseph Kishel P’73, P’85, July 25, Exeter, Pa.
Arthur Troast P’83, July 24, Jupiter, Fla.
PROFILE
Preparing for Service
Nigel Robinson ’14 advances on his path to the diplomatic service
by Tom Kertscher

Nigel Robinson ’14 is an agent of change who knows the value of playing the long game.

After Bucknell, Robinson worked for the Steppingstone Foundation in Boston, helping underserved children prepare for college success. But he also wanted to use his international relations major. “I wanted to expand my reach, to touch more lives and see more of the world,” he says.

Robinson won a fellowship in 2018 from the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program, named for the former Democratic congressman from New York. The U.S. State Department program was founded in 2002 to promote diversity and excellence in the corps of young diplomats.

Nigel Robinson attended the Independence Day
Photo: Muhammad-iffa Madthing
This June, Nigel Robinson ’14 attended the Independence Day celebration at the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok.
Homecoming
Coming Home
On a festive fall weekend, Oct. 4–6, 500 alumni, family members and friends gathered on campus for lots of fun and camaraderie. Highlights were the 10-year anniversary celebration for the T.E.A.M. Peer Mentoring Program, A Cappella Fest 2019 and the Bucknell Athletics Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony during the Homecoming game, where the Bison lost to Holy Cross, 21-14. Families could attend the Engineering Student Research Symposium, tour the University Farm, join in a cornhole tournament and enjoy the Ohio Burn Unit’s high-octane comedy fire show performance.
DO
Insider Access
The alumni directory has a new home!
Check out BucknellConnect, a private online community with tools to help you advance your career and grow your network.
Make History

" "Bucknell and the Holocaust

Professor David Del Testa, history, wishes to connect with alumni whose families were touched directly by the Holocaust. He is gathering information for a written reflection on the relationship of Bucknell and the Holocaust.
" "
Write ddeltest@bucknell.edu or call 570-577-3779.
Answer This:

What was your best student job?

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK TO SUBMIT YOUR ANSWER

Sweet Harmony
In Concert, Once Again

With a song in their hearts — and a lump in their throats — 31 alumni shared the Rooke Chapel stage with 17 current students to sing the plaintive “Hallelujah” on Nov. 2.

Written by Leonard Cohen and arranged by the group in its early years, “Hallelujah” has been the closing number for most Beyond Unison performances. So it was a natural choice for the conclusion of the acapella group’s 15th anniversary concert.

“As I look back over 15 years, I’m amazed at how the group has grown,” says Jon Backhaus ’07, who with Laura Householder McFalls ’08 and Anna Riker Mulligan ’08 founded Beyond Unison.

“Leading up to the weekend concert, the group started an email chain to share memories about what Beyond Unison meant to each person,” says Backhaus. “What struck me most was the sense of belonging — the sense of family — that has persisted through the years. In talking to alumni after the concert, I realized how the group has touched so many of us.”

Alumni and students each sang five songs, including Coldplay’s “Viva La Vida” and “Here Comes the Sun” by the Beatles. “I was amazed at how good the songs sounded,” says Max Code ’21, vice president of Beyond Unison. “It sounded like a release from the last spring concert.”

Bucknell Beauty on Any Device

Print is lovely, print is fine. It will be with us for a long, long time.

Well, that’s what we think here at Bucknell Magazine. But there’s also an advantage to having a digital replica of the print magazine to carry with you everywhere you go. And that’s why, starting with our Fall 2019 issue, we’re now offering a digital option. We’re only the second school — and the first private — in the nation to adopt this new technology, and we’re hearing good buzz from our readers.

Not only are the aesthetics of the print magazine preserved, but there are no downloads or apps required. Just type magazine.bucknell.edu into your browser, and start reading. This new, portable version of your print magazine works whether you’re using a tablet, a desktop or a smartphone. And our future issues will be archived at the above URL.

All the stories, photos and art are on display in the digital magazine. But one thing is not: Class Notes. And there’s a good reason. We want to protect any information our alumni wish to keep within the Bucknell family. Putting Class Notes into the digital sphere would make it more likely to be widely distributed. If you love the new digital edition and would like to opt out of the print magazine, you can join the list of digital subscribers, and we’ll send Class Notes to you in PDF form when each issue is published.

Bucknell digital magazine
Write bmagazine@bucknell.edu to opt out of the print edition or comment on our new digital magazine.
Witty Winners
Here are our favorite caption submissions from the last issue:
“You know, Professor, we’d be out of here a lot faster if you’d just let me snap a picture with my phone and post it to Instagram!”
Matt Grabel ’95
“Mary is often considered a ‘model student,’ but this crosses a line.”
Nicole Connor Taylor ’01
“Our version of ‘Whistler’s Mother’ will be ‘Arrangement in Blue and Orange No. 1.’ ”
Tim Lefever ’77
“She’s already 7-foot-2. Let’s remove the pituitary and see what happens.”
Lance Hicks ’73
“See, ri-ight about there is where you can paint in a left hand.”
Nancy Evans Armstrong ’75
Submit your caption for the retro photo on Page 69 to bmagazine@bucknell.edu or facebook.com/bucknellu by Feb. 10.
Vintage photograph of a woman
Photo: Special Collections/University Archives
Theatre Lighting Console

" "Drew Hopkins ’20 doesn’t seek the spotlight. The lighting designer for Bucknell’s dance, theatre and music shows says audiences shouldn’t think about the lighting at all. “My whole goal is for them to silently appreciate,” he says. “To say, ‘Wow, everything seemed right.’ ” If the stage is Hopkins’ canvas, the ETC Gio @5 is his paintbrush. The political science and theatre double major from Newtown Square, Pa., can take audiences from a sunlit square to a flashy nightclub with a few taps, keystrokes or twists of a dial. In the shadows, he shines.

Drew Hopkins ’20 in action at Bucknell
Drew Hopkins ’20 in action at Bucknell
Photos: Emily Paine
" "
Drew Hopkins ’20 has had an illuminating education at Bucknell, making the most of opportunities to light the stage for theatre, dance and music shows, using a professional lighting console.
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