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Adventures on 4 Wheels typography
Summer 2021
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BY WAY OF BUCKNELL
SOMEWHERE UNDER THE RAINBOW
The technicolor break in a stormy sky showers good luck on the Ellen Clarke Bertrand Library. Go to Page 20 to learn more about the library’s namesake.
If you would like a reprint of this photo, please fill out the form at bucknell.edu/bmagazine. We will send you a complimentary 8-by-10 print.
photograph by Emily Paine
 a stormy sky showers good luck on the Ellen Clarke Bertrand Library with a rainbow
BY WAY OF BUCKNELL
SOMEWHERE UNDER THE RAINBOW
The technicolor break in a stormy sky showers good luck on the Ellen Clarke Bertrand Library. Go to Page 20 to learn more about the library’s namesake.
If you would like a reprint of this photo, please fill out the form at bucknell.edu/bmagazine. We will send you a complimentary 8-by-10 print.
photograph by Emily Paine
Pathways
From Myanmar to Bucknell typography

by brooke thames

Since arriving in Lewisburg in 2018, Wutt Kyi ’22 has sought to empower others. She’s used a 3-D printer to create prosthetics for people who have lost fingers due to war, disease or natural disaster through her work with Bucknell’s chapter of e-NABLE. And the biomedical engineering major has co-led the new Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers.

Her advocacy extends to her embattled home country. When Myanmar’s military forcibly seized government control in February after a democratic election — sparking violent clashes between peaceful protestors and armed forces — Kyi transformed a Facebook group she co-created into a platform for Burmese people worldwide to coordinate advocacy efforts.

Pathways
Wutt Kyi smiling against a gray backdrop in a professional photo
From Myanmar to Bucknell typography
by brooke thames

Since arriving in Lewisburg in 2018, Wutt Kyi ’22 has sought to empower others. She’s used a 3-D printer to create prosthetics for people who have lost fingers due to war, disease or natural disaster through her work with Bucknell’s chapter of e-NABLE. And the biomedical engineering major has co-led the new Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers.

Her advocacy extends to her embattled home country. When Myanmar’s military forcibly seized government control in February after a democratic election — sparking violent clashes between peaceful protestors and armed forces — Kyi transformed a Facebook group she co-created into a platform for Burmese people worldwide to coordinate advocacy efforts.

Pathways
From a Promise to a Purpose typography

by bryan Wendell

Nikhil Trivedi ’21 was just 5 when he made a promise to his grandma.

“I agreed to become a doctor,” he says. “From then on, she’d always say, ‘my little Nikki’s going to be a doctor and make me proud.’”

That promise sparked a passion for science. In middle school, Trivedi remembers learning about the brain and being in awe.

“How can these microscopic cells make up who we are, how we act, how we think?” he says. “That just really interested me.”

Pathways
Nikhil Trivedi smiling against a light gray backdrop in a professional photo
From a Promise to a Purpose typography
by bryan Wendell

Nikhil Trivedi ’21 was just 5 when he made a promise to his grandma.

“I agreed to become a doctor,” he says. “From then on, she’d always say, ‘my little Nikki’s going to be a doctor and make me proud.’”

That promise sparked a passion for science. In middle school, Trivedi remembers learning about the brain and being in awe.

“How can these microscopic cells make up who we are, how we act, how we think?” he says. “That just really interested me.”

Gateway
Letters
An Appealing Issue: The spring edition of Bucknell Magazine makes me proud to be a Bucknellian! It would be a worthy addition to materials for prospective and/or accepted students. It says so much about important outcomes of a Bucknell education.
Martie Lauver Samek ’60, P’86, P’88, P’91, G’20, G’23, G’23, G’25
New York City
‘Showcasing’ of Diverse Backgrounds Applauded
I graduated from Bucknell a long time ago — back when the student body was very homogenous. I have been impressed to see that it is finally starting to change and that students of color and from many different backgrounds are now being courted by Bucknell. I had gotten the impression that diversity was lacking at Bucknell because graduates wanted their children to have the same experience they had when they were in college, which was basically no diversity. (I have long been reluctant to tell people I went to Bucknell and would only tell them where I went to graduate school, which was Temple, where the student body is quite diverse.)

I sincerely hope things are truly changing at Bucknell and that current and future students will have a chance to meet many more people of many different backgrounds during their college years than I did during mine. And I’m so glad you are showcasing many students of diverse backgrounds in the magazine. I hope other alumni are as happy about that as I am!

Ann Repplier ’72
Maple Glen, Pa.
What I'm Reading Logo for Bucknell Magazine
Nick Jones, Assistant professor of Spanish and faculty fellow for diversity, equity & inclusion
Sherri Kimmel, Editor
For questions or comments, contact me at sherri.kimmel@bucknell.edu
9/11, 20 Years On
Those of us old enough to remember Sept. 11, 2001, can recall where we were and what we were doing when two planes struck New York’s twin towers, igniting a horrific morning of terrorist attacks. But those who lost loved ones still carry the permanent weight of that day, nearly 20 years later. Bucknell lost five of its own.

Keith Coleman ’90 worked at Cantor Fitzgerald in One World Trade Center. He left behind wife Elodie Ferrante Coleman ’90, two small children and his parents. In that same building worked two other alumni, Bonnie Jean Shihadeh Smithwick ’68, at Fred Alger & Co., and Ryan McGinley ’97, at Carr Futures. She was survived by her husband, now deceased, and two children, and he was survived by his parents and two brothers.

Joseph Berry P ’96, P’03 and Bradley Fetchet ’99 were working at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods in Two World Trade Center that day. Joseph Berry’s wife, Evelyn, and children Joe ’96, Kimberley ’03 and Todd survived him. Bradley Fetchet left behind brothers Christopher ’11 and Wesley ’04 and parents Mary and Frank. Mary co-founded, with another survivor, the Voices Center for Resilience, a nonprofit that helps families and communities heal after tragedies.

As the 20th anniversary approaches, we lift up the names of those Bucknell lost but also extend our condolences to their loved ones, including one of our current students. Sara Micciulli ’23 was only 9 months old when her father, William, died at his Cantor Fitzgerald office. You can read Sara’s story of resilience in the article Shining a Light on 9/11.

An Earlier Computer
The chronological listing of major events in Bucknell’s history in the spring issue says that in 1962 Bucknell bought its first computer. I remember taking a class using Bucknell’s computer — punch cards — in spring 1961. If my memory serves me well, it was a Sperry Univac. I recall that the local industries rented time on our computer for $60 per hour. The computer was the size of my kitchen. In one of my classes we had to solve a fourth-degree equation, and John D’Elisa ’61, P’85, G’18, G’21 and I had the brilliant idea that we should use the computer.

So during a Friday class we put a matchbook cover in the door lock and returned on Saturday. The computer room was easy entry. We pulled the shades, and off we went. By trial and error, we solved the equation. The moral of the story is that Bucknell had a computer of its own before 1962!

Neal Fagin ’61
Sag Harbor, N.Y.
Editor’s note: Neal Fagin is correct. Some further inquiry turned up a paper by Dan Hyde, associate professor of computer science emeritus, that indicated Bucknell’s first computer, a Burroughs E103, was installed in 1957 and was used mainly by engineering faculty and students. In 1961, “an IBM 1620 mainframe computer was installed in the newly established Freas-Rooke Computer Center on the second floor of Dana,” Hyde wrote.
Correction
A letter to the editor in the Spring 2021 edition praising the late John Kirkland, professor emeritus of history, was written by Ken Lambert ’73, not Ken Lamb ’73. We regret the error.
Table of Contents
The Class of 2019 tribute shines in the summer sun.
From Myanmar to Bucknell
From a Promise to a Purpose
GATEWAY
Our readers share their thoughts.
9/11, 20 years on.
Graduation proceeded in an atypical setting.
In Lewisburg and far afield, Bucknell’s students and staff make a positive and palpable difference.
Victim’s daughter finds comfort in classmates’ compassion.
Six students and professors earn Fulbright and Boren awards.
Professor James Mark Shields reveals his faves.
Aaron Hanlon ’04 is an enlightened professor.
Lessons in Resistance explores Martin Luther King’s goals and messages.
Ashley Ramos ’23 broke the school record in the 10K.
Brandon Seymore describes how to protect your personal information.
Karen Schulz ’75 takes fiber art in new directions.
Caroline Feeney ’91 offers advice for women in leadership roles.
FEATURES
Buildings and their namesakes have a surprising history.

New Holmes Hall was named for alumni couple who met at Bucknell.

Jewish student recalls ups and downs of his 1940s Bucknell experience.
New rabbi energizes Jewish student life.
Joe Blaustein ’47 still teaches budding artists at age 97.
Bucknellians share their adventures on four wheels.
’RAY BUCKNELL
Alumni journeys illustrate the power of interdisciplinary education.
Wendy Millman Troxel ’95 guides couples to better sleep habits.
Catch up with Bucknell alumni in pictures.
Betsy Neary Sholl ’67, P’93 blazes a poetic trail.
Maryam Ahmad M’90 leads the Chicago Bar Association.
Douglas Bonner ’80 describes a startling ‘Secret War’ experience.
Steve Bass ’79 keeps Oregonians informed and entertained.
Veterans recover with the help of Phil Tulkoff ’83 and his golden retriever sidekicks.
Pattie Beers McGlinchey ’89 brings healing, hope to burn victims.
Shauna Sobers ’01 pairs her artistic passion with advice for career progression.
Rachel Gibson ’15 excels in the male-dominated finance industry.
Bucknellians make their mark caring for animals.
George Haymaker ’83 helps people get healthy eating Think Ice Cream.
Remember your friends, family and classmates.
GlenTullman ’81 commemorates an enduring student/teacher relationship with a $6 million gift.
Your opportunities to get involved.
Virtual Reunion brought together alumni from around the world.
Prospective students can explore Bucknell virtually.
Dennis Gale ’64 keeps in tune with a banjo.
Bucknell

magazine

Volume 14, Issue 3

Vice President For Communications
Heather Johns

Editor
Sherri Kimmel

Design
Amy Wells

Associate Editor
Matt Hughes

Class Notes Editor
Heidi Hormel

Contributors
Brad Tufts
Emily Paine
Brooke Thames
Bryan Wendell

Editorial Assistant
Kim Faulk

Website
bucknell.edu/bmagazine

Contact
Email: bmagazine@bucknell.edu
Class Notes:
classnotes@bucknell.edu
Telephone: 570-577-3611

Bucknell Magazine
(ISSN 1044-7563), of which this is volume 14, number 3, is published in winter, spring, summer and fall by Bucknell University, One Dent Drive, Lewisburg, PA 17837. Periodicals Postage paid at Lewisburg, PA and additional mailing offices.
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Circulation
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Send all address changes to:
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Mix Paper from responsible sources
171st Commencement
Audra Wilson ’94 in a teacher's graduation cap and gown giving her keynote address at Bucknell’s 171st Commencement
Ruby Lee ’21 in a graduation cap and gown giving her speech at at Bucknell’s 171st Commencement
Encouragement for a Class of Change-Makers
by Brooke Thames
Speakers at Bucknell’s 171st Commencement delivered inspiring messages about empathy, courage and growth to the 875 members of the Class of 2021. On May 23, the graduates were recognized across three ceremonies in Christy Mathewson–Memorial Stadium, allowing for proper social distancing amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

In her keynote address, lawyer and policy shaper Audra Wilson ’94 urged the graduates to use the knowledge they gained at Bucknell to build a better future.

News Ticker
SEEING THE LIGHT
Professors Sarah Lower, biology, and Doug Collins, chemistry, were awarded a $642,000 National Science Foundation grant for a five-year study of chemical signal evolution in fireflies. The researchers will compare North American firefly species that use light versus pheromone signals in seeking and finding mates.
BACK TO CAMPUS
Bucknell will again welcome students to campus for in-person classes in 2021-22. The University will also return to its regular, unmodified academic calendar for the fall 2021 semester and potentially the spring 2022 semester, barring a COVID-19 resurgence. Fall semester classes begin Monday, Aug. 23.
AWARDS GALORE
Bucknellians won four National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program grants to pursue research-based master’s and doctoral degrees at U.S. institutions. Grants went to: Gari Eberly ’21, biomedical engineering and creative writing; William Snyder ’21, neuroscience; Jose Valera ’19, biology; and Karen Peralta-Martinez ’17, biology. Bucknell students and graduates also received five honorable mentions.
AROUND TOWN AND AROUND THE GLOBE
’burg and Beyond
In Lewisburg and far afield, Bucknell’s students and staff make a positive and palpable difference.
Students in India
Photo: Suvarna Tai
" "
Bucknell students partnered virtually with students in India to study efforts by women to help in their communities.

" "Pune, India
For students in Professor Coralynn Davis’ Gender, Power and Global Development course, Zoom became more than a means to attend class remotely — it became a door to another world. Taught this spring in partnership with the Institute for Study Abroad, the course connected Bucknellians with students in India to gain insight into gender and social equity issues in the developing nation.

AROUND TOWN AND AROUND THE GLOBE
’burg and Beyond
In Lewisburg and far afield, Bucknell’s students and staff make a positive and palpable difference.
Val LaMore, Paul Danenberg, Callie Sullivan standing on a grassy lawn at Bucknell
Photo: Emily Paine
" "
Val LaMore ’23, Paul Danenberg ’23 and Callie Sullivan ’23 launched a GED tutoring program.

" "Danville, Pa.
When Professor Annie Randall started a music course inside Danville’s North Central Secure Treatment Unit in 2015, she hoped Bucknellians could be a light in the lives of at-risk youth. This spring, those hopes were further realized when students launched a General Educational Development (GED) tutoring program at North Central, a residential facility for girls and young women, ages 12-21.

Portrait photo of Sara Micciulli ’23 smiling and looking away with crossed arms in a brown sweater
Photos: Emily Paine
Support from fellow students has been uplifting for Sara Micciulli ’23.
Shining a Light on 9/11
Classmates rally to buoy victim’s daughter on a most difficult day
by Sherri Kimmel
The anniversary of 9/11 is for many Americans a time for somber memories. Sara Micciulli ’23, however, recalls nothing about that day. She was only 9 months old. But the nation’s most deadly terrorist attack had a devastating impact on her life. Her 30-year-old father, William, a rising star and senior vice president at Cantor Fitzgerald, was working on the 104th floor of One World Trade Center when a plane plowed into the tower, the first struck that day.
Bucknellians Take Their Curiosity Abroad
At Bucknell, curiosity can take you anywhere — even thousands of miles from home.

Over the next year, three students and three professors will bring their Bucknell experiences overseas through educational travel funded by the Fulbright Program and Boren Awards.

Sara Butler ’21, who graduated in May with degrees in physics and philosophy, received a Fulbright to study quantum gravity in Vienna.

“You could work your entire life on this kind of research without solving the problem,” she says. “I don’t expect to get results, but I do hope to have a greater sense of working within a group and knowing how to think like a scientist, especially when it comes to deeply theoretical problems.”

What I'm Reading Logo for Bucknell Magazine
Portrait illustration of a smiling James Mark Shields in a collared shirt and blazer
James Mark Shields
Professor of Comparative Humanities and Asian Thought
Book cover of Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World by Kamo-no-Chomei
Kamo-no-Chomei, Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World
In the year 1202, amid fires and famine, court poet Kamo-no-Chomei left his cushy imperial post to take Buddhist vows and retire to the mountains outside Kyoto, where he spent his last years in solitude in a tiny, thatched hut composing this famous prose poem. Like Thoreau’s Walden, the Hojoki is less an outright rejection of his troubled world than it is an attempt to reflect on the human condition in historical context, employing the tools of both Buddhism and Sino-Japanese poetics.
Book cover of Black Reconstruction in America, 1860–1880 by W.E.B. DuBois
W.E.B. DuBois, Black Reconstruction in America, 1860–1880
Through a wealth of data and extensive excerpts from the historical records, DuBois reveals, in this 1935 work, the “lost opportunity” of the Reconstruction period, which was deliberately and effectively thwarted by the collusion of Southern white elites and Northern politicians and industrialists. This was the first book to challenge the racist historical narrative of the era, showing the courage and talent of African Americans in attempting to reconstruct U.S. democracy in the postwar era. As such it is both tragic and hopeful.
Book cover of News from Nowhere by William Morris
William Morris, News from Nowhere
In this influential literary utopia published in 1890, Victorian polymath Morris imagines a postrevolutionary England bereft of urban squalor, industrial pollution, private property, courts, crime and poverty, where children are educated by roaming the woods learning “practical” activities. Morris’ biting critique of industrial capitalism and the structures of inequality that enforce and uphold it ring just as true today as in his own time, particularly given his overarching concerns: nature, beauty, pleasure and freedom.
What I'm Reading Logo for Bucknell Magazine
Portrait illustration of a smiling James Mark Shields in a collared shirt and blazer
James Mark Shields
Professor of Comparative Humanities and Asian Thought
Book cover of Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World by Kamo-no-Chomei
Kamo-no-Chomei, Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World
In the year 1202, amid fires and famine, court poet Kamo-no-Chomei left his cushy imperial post to take Buddhist vows and retire to the mountains outside Kyoto, where he spent his last years in solitude in a tiny, thatched hut composing this famous prose poem. Like Thoreau’s Walden, the Hojoki is less an outright rejection of his troubled world than it is an attempt to reflect on the human condition in historical context, employing the tools of both Buddhism and Sino-Japanese poetics.
Book cover of Black Reconstruction in America, 1860–1880 by W.E.B. DuBois
W.E.B. DuBois, Black Reconstruction in America, 1860–1880
Through a wealth of data and extensive excerpts from the historical records, DuBois reveals, in this 1935 work, the “lost opportunity” of the Reconstruction period, which was deliberately and effectively thwarted by the collusion of Southern white elites and Northern politicians and industrialists. This was the first book to challenge the racist historical narrative of the era, showing the courage and talent of African Americans in attempting to reconstruct U.S. democracy in the postwar era. As such it is both tragic and hopeful.
Book cover of News from Nowhere by William Morris
William Morris, News from Nowhere
In this influential literary utopia published in 1890, Victorian polymath Morris imagines a postrevolutionary England bereft of urban squalor, industrial pollution, private property, courts, crime and poverty, where children are educated by roaming the woods learning “practical” activities. Morris’ biting critique of industrial capitalism and the structures of inequality that enforce and uphold it ring just as true today as in his own time, particularly given his overarching concerns: nature, beauty, pleasure and freedom.
Pop Quiz
Aaron
Hanlon ’04
An Enlightened Professor
Hanlon’s academic career spans a wide range of disciplines. The track and field recruit from Pittsburgh majored in political science at Bucknell before earning a doctorate in English at the University of Oxford, focusing on British and early-U.S. Enlightenment novels. Now an English professor at Colby College, he also directs the program in science, technology and society. Hanlon authored A World of Disorderly Notions: Quixote and the Logic of Exceptionalism and is writing a book about science denialism.
Aaron Hanlon photographed, standing in an office
" "
Aaron Hanlon ’04
Photos: April Le; Wikimedia Commons
Cool Class clipart
three quarter view of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial statue in Washington, DC
Lessons in Resistance, 1951-2021
What Class?
Lessons in Resistance, 1951-2021
Who Teaches It?
Professor Adam Burgos, philosophy; Professor Cymone Fourshey, history and international relations and director of the Griot Institute for the Study of Black Lives & Cultures; Professor Kelly Knox, dance; and the Rev. Kurt Nelson, director of religious & spiritual life.
At some point in their education, most students at Bucknell have read a few famous lines spoken by Martin Luther King Jr. — “I have a dream that one day…” or “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Certainly, Bucknellians have heard King’s name invoked each January by politicians of all stripes who use King’s words to make bland political platitudes.

This course calls on students to delve into the contradiction between King, the dynamic and politically savvy philosopher, preacher and movement leader, and King the static, uncomplicated national icon. Seen as a Black radical in the 1960s because his message threatened the status quo of white domination, by the 1990s King had been recreated and embraced as a national icon. While his message and actions are now taught in schools and commemorated nationally each January, we ask: What shifted in three decades to make him more palatable?

Ashlyn Ramos (second from left) running at a track meet
Photo: Don Paul
" "
Ashlyn Ramos (second from left) was an All-Patriot League First Team honoree in 2021 and broke the school record in the 10K.
Fast Footwork
by Andrew Faught
Growing up in Sammamish, Wash., the daughter of marathon-running parents, Ashlyn Ramos ’23 would cheer her mom and dad from the sidelines on race day.

But of one thing she was certain: “I really hated running when I was little.”

That’s until her parents signed her up for a “fun run” in elementary school. Ramos won the race and, with the victory, a pair of running shoes. “Oh, I’m kind of good at this,” she recalls thinking. That pivotal moment spurred her to join the cross-country teams in middle school and high school.

Ask the Expert text
How to Protect Your Personal Information
Illustration of Brandon Seymore
Illustration: Joel Kimmel
" " Criminal “phishing” attacks are increasingly common and sophisticated. To steal our identities and financial assets, fraudsters want us to give up personally identifiable information (PII) such as Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers and credit-card numbers. Brandon Seymore, a Bucknell network engineer/information security analyst, explains how to keep our personal information safe.
AN UNTRADITIONAL APPROACH
Not Your Grandmother’s Quilts
Award-winning fiber artist Karen Schulz ’75 takes quilting in bold, daring directions
by Kristin Baird Rattini
Headshot
Photos: Mark Gulezian/Quicksilver
" "
Karen Schulz ’75 with her quilt Objects in This Mirror.
K

aren Schulz ’75 wandered the galleries of Quilt National in Athens, Ohio, looking for her entry Girl in the City with Blue Hair. She was thrilled to be accepted by this prestigious, biennial juried competition for contemporary art quilts on just the second time she applied. But as she turned one corner after the next, she could not find her submission.

“I thought, ‘It’s not here. They must have made a mistake,’ ” Schulz recalls. “Someone is going to tap me on the shoulder and say, ‘We’re sorry, but you didn’t actually get in the show, and you’ll have to leave now.’ ”

But then a staff member guided Schulz to her quilt, prominently displayed with a medallion on it right by the front door. “I thought, ‘Great! I won something,’ ” she says. “Then I found out I had won Best of Show. I could barely stand.”

Since that win in 2015, Schulz has earned the standing of one of the nation’s leading contemporary fiber artists. She won a second Best of Show at Quilt National in 2019 for her piece A Conversation and judged the 2021 competition. She has loaned two of her pieces to the State Department’s esteemed Art in Embassies program. And two of her works — A Conversation as well as … and the Skeptic — are now in the permanent collection of the International Quilt Museum in Lincoln, Neb.

Q&A
Illustration of Caroline Feeney
Illustration: Joel Kimmel
Caroline Feeney ’91
Lessons in Leadership
by Sherri Kimmel
Caroline Feeney ’91 was recently named CEO of U.S. Insurance & Retirement Businesses for Prudential Financial Inc., making her part of a select group of women today who are CEOs. Feeney joined Prudential, where her sister and role model, Angie Feeney Knightly ’89, was already working, in 1993. Caroline, a double major in economics and English, moved steadily up the career ladder while raising a son and daughter with her husband, Rob. Among other awards and recognition throughout her career, Caroline became the first woman to receive the Round Table of New York’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2018.
Q. Once you set goals in your career, how do you know who can guide you in the right direction?
Find somebody who is able to see some of the work that you do, but is not necessarily in your direct reporting lines. It may be someone you’ve met through a networking meeting, through work on a project, or by hearing them speak and seeing there’s something in their leadership style or their values that resonates with you. The connection is important in a mentoring relationship.
Features
VAN VENTURES The open road is calling
photograph of Jeff Hines ’84 in South Dakota by Patti Stirk
Features
VAN VENTURES The open road is calling
photograph of Jeff Hines ’84 in South Dakota by Patti Stirk
Features
VAN VENTURES The open road is calling
photograph of Jeff Hines ’84 in South Dakota by Patti Stirk
Title of article
You know their names, but do you know the people behind these seven Bucknell spots?
By Bryan Wendell

Illlustrations by Jane Brooks

Photo: Emily Paine
A bust of Bucknell’s first Black graduate, Edward McKnight Brawley, Class of 1875, reposes outside the building named for Charles P. Vaughan.
Title of article
You know their names, but do you know the people behind these seven Bucknell spots?
By Bryan Wendell

Illlustrations by Jane Brooks

Photo: Emily Paine
A bust of Bucknell’s first Black graduate, Edward McKnight Brawley, Class of 1875, reposes outside the building named for Charles P. Vaughan.
L - Dropcap
et’s meet for breakfast at Bostwick, head to class at Vaughan Lit and spend the afternoon browsing books at Bertrand.

Generations of Bucknellians are on a last-name basis with these and dozens of other buildings and locations on campus. The names conjure an instant image, but it’s usually one of brick, steel or concrete — not of the person whose name is immortalized there.

People like Robert L. Rooke, Class of 1913, who worked for Merrill Lynch after graduation, advanced quickly and oversaw the firm’s trading during the stock market crash of 1929. His family’s many gifts to Bucknell helped build Rooke Chapel, the Freas-Rooke Pool and the Rooke Science Center. At his death in 1994, Rooke was believed to be the oldest member of the New York Stock Exchange, having held a seat there for 66 years.

Portrait of Steve Holmes
Photo: Emily Paine
Bucknell’s newest building, Holmes Hall, is named for Steve Holmes ’79, P’06, P’08, P’12.
New Building is a Testament to Interdisciplinary Learning
When Steve Holmes ’79, P’06, P’08, P’12 landed his first job as a CPA for what is now Deloitte in New York City, expectations were high and the pace often frantic, and Holmes found himself needing to draw on his dual academic interests. At Bucknell, he’d majored in accounting but took nearly enough art & art history courses to earn a minor.

“I was fresh out of college, and I was thrust into dealing with CFOs and controllers of big companies like Mitsubishi and Dean Witter,” Holmes says. “My background in art history allowed me to talk with people who were at a different level.

Joe Blaustein ’47 in his home studio in Topanga, Calif.
Photo: Shayan Asgharnia
A World Exploding typography
Jewish alum from the 1940s experienced educational ecstasy and social rejection at Bucknell
by Joe Blaustein ’47
Details, details, details.
That’s what makes writing come to life. Joe Blaustein ’47 has that skill down pat.

His childhood home, a 16-story iron apartment building on Riverside Drive between 83rd and 84th streets in Manhattan, provides plenty of details to draw from. Babe Ruth lived a few floors above the Blaustein family — Joe; his two older sisters; his father, a Jewish refugee from the early 20th-century pogroms in what is now Ukraine who, Blaustein says, became “New York’s official bankruptcy auctioneer”; and his decorative mother. The latter created quite a stir in Lewisburg during Blaustein’s first year.

He writes, “Archie, our chauffeur, drove my mother up for a visit — the only member of my family to ever do so. Mother wore red, red lipstick, had Theda Bara-style plucked eyebrows, and smoked while walking in the street. I found out later she was the gossip of the town: People thought she was a prostitute.”

Recalling one detail from decades ago leads to another and another. He tells me before recounting an incident from his childhood:

“I remember getting in the elevator with this woman. She was beautifully made up, staggeringly beautiful. And I remember her hair — black hair that curled around, very French. Named Essie. And I remember how she smelled. Wow. In writing the detail of that fragrance [in his autobiography] I realize that impression still lives with me.”

The 1,200-pages-and-counting autobiography Blaustein is writing is chockful of details like those above. On the following pages is an excerpt from his chapter on Bucknell. I hope you relish these palpable descriptions by a Jewish student of the 1940s as much as I did.

— Sherri Kimmel, Editor

Jewish student life is ‘on an upward trajectory’
Rabbi Jessica Goldberg
Photo: Emily Paine
Rabbi Jessica Goldberg has been working to build community since arriving in August 2020.

Jewish life at Bucknell has evolved far beyond what Joe Blaustein ’47 experienced in the early 1940s, when the Sammies were the center of a young Jewish man’s world. Today there are 197 self-identified Jewish students on campus, served by the well-appointed Berelson Center for Jewish Life, which has two kitchens, one kosher, the other kosher style; an active, student-run Hillel; and most important, Rabbi Jessica Goldberg.

Goldberg arrived in August, not the opportune time for the Hebrew College graduate to start her rabbinical career. Social distancing has not muted her efforts, though. “Jewish life at Bucknell is on an upward trajectory,” she says. “I’ve been seeing a lot of enthusiasm about the future. Maybe part of that is because people have been cut off from their friends.”

Among the programs that bring Jewish students together is the Hillel International-sponsored Jewish Learning Fellowship, a 10-week program with a “group of about 10 students who come together for dinner once a week and discuss hot-button topics and life’s big questions,” she says.

Joe Blaustein: A Life in Art
It’s a Wednesday morning in Topanga, Calif., and Joe Blaustein, age 97, is leading a three-and-a-half-hour art class. His eight students — from mid-20s to senior citizens — are Zooming in from Los Angeles, England, Portugal. “They’re an amazing group, amazing — each of them,” gushes Blaustein.

Many of them started their Blaustein journey years ago, when he was teaching art through the UCLA Extension (continuing education) program, which named him Distinguished Instructor of the Year in 2011. After 63 years with UCLA, Blaustein began offering private lessons on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Students paint or draw for the first and last 90 minutes, bridging a half-hour art appreciation lecture by Blaustein.

On one recent Wednesday he introduces Papunya paintings, showing several images of the intricate Indigenous paintings from Australia that he says typify “art that tells a story. Their art is variety within unity. It’s as beautiful as anything in the art world today.”

His lectures cruise from African American painters Alice Neel and Alma Thomas to Zimbabwean painter Virginia Chihota. Explorations of British artists Chantal Joffe and Cecily Brown give way to calligraphic American painter Mark Tobey, British Indian sculptor Anish Kapoor, Chinese artist Ai Weiwei and more.

Joe Blaustein Side Profile
Photo: Shayan Asgharnia
Bucknellians share their adventures on four wheels
by Eveline Chao
mountain range view through a car window
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Courtney Condy ’13 can see Moab, Utah, from her rolling office (Jeep) window.
Photograph by Courtney Condy ’13
T

he call of the open road is one of the great, prevailing themes of American life. It’s explored in seminal works ranging from Mark Twain’s travel narratives to Jack Kerouac’s On the Road to, more recently, Elizabeth Gilbert’s blockbuster memoir Eat Pray Love and this year’s Academy Award-winning film Nomadland, directed by Chloé Zhao.

In recent years, the popular Instagram hashtag “vanlife” has inspired a younger generation to hit the road, while the increased ease of remote work has collapsed the boundary between the office and vacation. Business investors are also exploring more ways to cater to vanlife culture, according to a 2020 New York Times story, such as building parks with areas for children and pets and business centers with office essentials.

Many Bucknellians have also embraced the open road. They range from retirees to current undergrads, traveling in vans or RVs, Jeeps or trailers and sleeping in every situation imaginable.

'ray Bucknell typography
BISON STRONG The 1942 class gift perches outside MacDonald Commons
photograph by Emily Paine
From the President department heading
Illustration of John C. Bravman, President
Illustration: Joel Kimmel
The Power of Interdisciplinary Education
As I write this, we’ve made it to the other side of a history- making year. For the first time in Bucknell’s 175 years, we mounted three Commencement ceremonies. By segmenting our ceremonies and limiting the number of guests, we could give our Class of 2021 seniors the personal graduation experience they and their families deserved. We look forward to celebrating the Class of 2020 in person, as well.
And now we look ahead to what is shaping up to be a superlative incoming Class of 2025. We easily surpassed our May 1 goal of enrolling 1,000 new students, with 62% planning to enter the College of Arts & Sciences, 19.2% favoring engineering and 18.8% intending to study management, as of May 12.
Book Talk circle
Sharing the Covers: Every couple's guide to better sleep book cover
Perchance to Dream
by George Spencer
Tired but wired. That’s the woe facing too many couples. Psychologist Wendy Millman Troxel ’95 wants them to rest easy. “Sleep is vital for your own health and your relationship’s health,” says Troxel, one of the leading scientific authorities on sleep and couples. “We spend a third of our lives doing this activity with our partner, and we’re still learning so much about it.”

Seventy million Americans suffer from chronic poor sleep, insomnia being the most common disorder. One-third of adults say their own or their partner’s sleep problems have made a nightmare of their waking hours. Troxel, a senior behavioral and social scientist at the RAND Corporation, has been researching sleep and treating sleep disorders for the last 15 years.

CRUSHING SLEEP MYTHS
Her new book, Sharing the Covers: Every Couple’s Guide to Better Sleep, crushes couples’ sleep myths. Does bedtime sex make sleep better? “The research is quite conflicted,” she says. Does sleeping in separate beds (what some call ‘sleep divorce’) signify a troubled marriage? “No, but how you come to that decision says a lot more about your relationship.” Is it true couples shouldn’t go to bed angry? She’s found a better way to frame it: “Don’t fight before bedtime.”
Sharing the Covers: Every couple's guide to better sleep book cover
Wendy Millman Troxel headshot
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Wendy Millman Troxel ’95 is spreading the word on the science of sleep.
Alumni Photo Gallery
Images will scroll automatically
1953 — Five SAE brothers had a mini-reunion and lunch May 21 at the Nassau Inn, Princeton, N.J. Pictured from left are Ken Cestari ’58, Tony Rinaldo ’60, Bill Hagerman ’57, Doug Grigg ’59 and Penn “Doc” Shelley ’53.

2017 — Billy Pinamont ’17 continued his family legacy of military service, becoming the third generation to serve in the armed forces. He was commissioned as an ensign during a ceremony at the Union League of Philadelphia on June 17. Pinamont, a student at Penn State College of Medicine, was awarded a full U.S. Navy Health Professions Scholarship for the MD program and will serve in the medical corps after graduation.

A four-year member of Bucknell’s crew team, Pinamont had the support of his former team at the Commissioning Ceremony. From left: Head Coach Dan Wolleben, Ryan McSherry ’19, Sam Jubb ’17, Billy Pinamont ’17, Nick Barpoulis ’17, Mike Pallotta ’18 and 2nd Lieutenant Dillon LaFata ’18.

2017 — Billy Pinamont ’17 continued his family legacy of military service, becoming the third generation to serve in the armed forces. He was commissioned as an ensign during a ceremony at the Union League of Philadelphia on June 17. Pinamont, a student at Penn State College of Medicine, was awarded a full U.S. Navy Health Professions Scholarship for the MD program and will serve in the medical corps after graduation.

His father administered the oath of office. From left: Capt. James Backstrom, Capt. William J. Pinamont Jr., William J. Pinamont III and Petty Officer David Cooley.

Catch up with Bucknell alumni in pictures.

Submit your own photos to Bucknell Magazine by contacting your class reporter or emailing classnotes@bucknell.edu

PROFILE
Finding Life in Language
Betsy Neary Sholl ’67, P’93 blazes a poetic trail
by Brooke Thames
Words didn’t always come easily to Betsy Neary Sholl ’67, P’93, who stuttered throughout childhood. When she began putting pen to paper, writing suddenly became “my way of communicating those inner workings I had trouble getting out,” she says.

But it was at Bucknell — reading the electrifying works of William Butler Yeats and Allen Ginsberg in poetry courses — where the English major discovered the form that would spark her wordplay.

“With poetry, there’s a point where the language itself takes over, where you just let go of yourself and follow where it wants to go,” says Sholl, who’s published nine poetry collections. “The movement, the lyrical associations, the wildness of it — I love those moments of discovery and surprise where it feels like the poem is leading you.”

Betsy Neary Sholl headshot
Photo: Hannah Tarkinson
Poet Betsy Neary Sholl ’67, P’93 discovered her passion for wordplay at Bucknell.
Flashback
Maryam Ahmad headshot
Photo: Trinity Goode
Chi-Town Legal Eagle
Maryam Ahmad M’90 is the chief of the Juvenile Justice Bureau for the Cook County, Ill., State’s Attorney’s Office. She oversees all of Cook County’s child protection and juvenile delinquency prosecutions. She is also president of the Chicago Bar Association, one of the nation’s oldest and largest metropolitan bar associations, with more than 18,000 judges and lawyers as members.
1. How did Bucknell shape your career?
While working in University Admissions, I enrolled in evening classes and completed my master’s degree in English literary criticism. I achieved this milestone due to Bucknell’s tuition remission program for employees.
2. What class opened your eyes the most?
Professor Richard Smith’s Chaucer course introduced me to medieval literature and The Canterbury Tales. Professor Smith was soft-spoken and erudite. He challenged my imagination in ways I never imagined.
WAYFINDER
Douglas Bonner ’80
In 1971, I was an American expatriate teen living in Vientiane, the capital of the Kingdom of Laos, on the banks of the Mekong River. During the Vietnam War, Laos was officially neutral, but the hard truth was that because the Ho Chi Minh Trail — the principal supply route for North Vietnamese (NVA) military operations — stretched through much of its country, Laos was home to a “Secret War.” The CIA conducted one of its longest sustained paramilitary operations ever in Laos.

One summer evening, my father, an undercover CIA operations officer, asked, “Dougie, want to join me for an overnight trip up country?” This wasn’t going to be just any trip; after all, my dad supervised paramilitary operations for a living. (In fact, he once asked me to help identify a Russian KGB agent who had unexpectedly visited our home.)

Our destination was an isolated mountain village called Nam Yu near the Chinese border. As reported by the U.S. press, Nam Yu was a CIA listening post and a training and recruiting area for Hmong and Yao tribesmen fighting NVA regulars in northeastern Laos. Before it fell in February 1973, Nam Yu also was a staging area for intelligence gathering across the Chinese border.

Doug Bonner as a young teen aboard a Thai fishing boat
Photo: Douglas G. Bonner Jr.
Doug Bonner ’80 as a young teen aboard a Thai fishing boat near Pattaya on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand.
PROFILE
From the Front Lines
Steve Bass ’79 keeps Oregonians informed and entertained
by Bryan Wendell
They don’t spend much time on Kevlar vests in journalism school. Or in economics classes at Bucknell.

But for Steve Bass ’79, ensuring his reporters had bulletproof vests, helmets and gas masks as they covered racial-justice protests was just another of 2020’s harsh realities.

As the president and CEO of Oregon Public Broadcasting, Bass oversees a team of 180 that covered a trio of once-in-a-century stories in 2020: the global pandemic, historic wildfires and 140 straight days of protests in Portland.

Steve Bass at the office
Photo: Corey Arnold
Steve Bass ’79 keeps a large team on track at Oregon Public Broadcasting.
PROFILE
Canine Collaborator
Veterans get back on their feet with the help of Phil Tulkoff ’83 and his golden retriever sidekicks
by Matt Hughes
Phil Tulkoff ’83 began his career as an aerospace engineer, including a stint with NASA, but his volunteer work keeps him much closer to the ground.

“I started by picking up poop in the yard; that was my first assignment,” he says.

Tulkoff, who now runs his family’s food-manufacturing business in Baltimore, is a founding board member for Valor Service Dogs, which trains and donates golden and Labrador retrievers for combat-wounded veterans of post-9/11 conflicts.

Phil Tulkoff holding a golden retriever
Photo: Peter Fellows
Phil Tulkoff ’83 with his dog Sarah.
PROFILE
After the Fire
Pattie Beers McGlinchey ’89 brings healing, hope to burn victims
by Bryan Wendell
Zachary Sutterfield hurled himself out of the burning second-story apartment building, landing headfirst on the ground below.

He survived, but the 2018 fire in San Marcos, Texas, killed five fellow college students, including two of Sutterfield’s close friends.

With burns covering 70% of his body, Sutterfield’s road back has been long, exhausting and painful.

But he’s not traveling it alone. He’s had help from people like Pattie Beers McGlinchey ’89, a physical therapist at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research Burn Center in San Antonio.

Pattie Beers McGlinchey medically wrapping someones fingers
Photo: Steven Galvan
Pattie Beers McGlinchey ’89 provides care to severely burned service members.
PROFILE
The Dance of Leadership
Shauna Sobers ’01 pairs her artistic passion with advice for career progression
by Matt Zencey
When Shauna Sobers ’01 is coaching would-be leaders, she has some counterintuitive advice: a good leader knows when to follow. It’s an insight that comes from her lifelong passion for dance.

Her passion was first kindled through her family roots in Barbados, where she learned calypso and soca dancing, and it grew during formal dance training at the Harlem School of the Arts. While majoring in economics at Bucknell, she performed and choreographed with the Bucknell Dance Company. Today, when Sobers is not busy with her job as an assistant director for residence life at the University of Texas at Austin and her side business in leadership training, she teaches dance and appears with companies that perform tango, salsa and bachata.

Shauna Sobers headshot
Photo: Yanyi Annie Liu
Shauna Sobers ’01’s lifelong passion for dance parlays into her professional pursuits.
PROFILE
Investing in Women
Rachel Gibson ’15 excels in the male-dominated finance industry
by Matt Hughes
When she was still in elementary school, her parents would joke, “Your brother likes trucks, your sister likes dolls, and you like commerce.” By high school, Rachel Gibson ’15 was poring over investment guides.

“I’d always been intrigued by the buying and selling of goods and what makes one business more successful than the next,” says Gibson. “I knew if I could find a job that married this curiosity with my interest in the markets and investing, I’d never feel like I’m working a day in my life.”

Today, she balances a full-time MBA program at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business with steering Darden Capital Management, a student-led program that manages approximately $27 million of UVA’s endowment. In April 2020, Gibson became the first woman in the program’s 30-year history to hold the CEO position. Her next role will be as an investor with J.P. Morgan Private Bank.

Rachel Gibson headshot
Photo: Heather Dodge
Rachel Gibson ’15 balances an MBA program and endowment management.
Career
Clusters
Whether studying through the interdisciplinary Animal Behavior Program or taking a different academic path, Bucknell alumni have found fulfillment working with the planet’s creatures, great and small, in zoos, animal clinics, training businesses and more.
Career Clusters graphic
Entrepreneur Spotlight
George Haymaker eating an ice cream cone in a purple polo shirt
Photo: Sydney Jai
Ice cream helped George Haymaker ’83 get healthy. Now he helps others.
Re:THINK Ice Cream
by Lori Ferguson
After entering recovery from addiction to alcohol and pain pills, George Haymaker ’83 craved sugar. “I love ice cream, and I was eating a lot of it,” he recalls. As he began to feel the effects of all that sugar, Haymaker began searching for a replacement for his favorite treat. He came up empty-handed. “All the ‘healthy’ ice creams were icy and chalky in flavor and texture, so I decided to come up with an alternative,” he says. Re:THINK Ice Cream was his solution.

In 2018, he began offering consumers an ice cream that was lower in fat, sugar, carbohydrates and calories but still had a satisfying taste and texture. After about a year, Haymaker began hearing more and more people complain of lactose intolerance and decided to reformulate Re:THINK to make it more “tummy friendly,” he says.

IN MEMORIAM
Remember your friends, family, classmates and others by posting a comment on our online Book of Remembrance. Go to bucknell.edu/bmagazine.
1942
David Farquhar, Jan. 29, Myrtle Beach, S.C.
1944
Donald Kanally, March 21, Bradford, Pa.
1945
C. Harold Cohn P’76, Feb. 11, Wernersville, Pa.
1946
Doris Miller Smith, March 18, Hockessin, Del.

Virginia “Jinny” Bell Wiltz, Dec. 17, Long Beach, Calif.

1947
Ruth Gay Frederick, Jan. 25, Lakewood, Pa.

Eugene Katz, Jan. 10, Warminster, Pa.

1948
Audrey Krauss Angelides, Jan. 8, Newtown Square, Pa.
1949
Betty Peterman Eberhart P’79, P’86, Feb. 10, Williamsport, Pa.

Donald McKeeby, Feb. 17, Hilton, N.Y.

Nancy Barker Shaw, Jan. 31, High Point, N.C.

1950
Bill Fearen, Feb. 24, Camp Hill, Pa.

George Little, Jan. 17, Gwynedd Valley, Pa.

Harold Reed, Jan. 21, Horseheads, N.Y.

Glen Tullman ’81 (right) has been a frequent visitor to Professor Candland’s Lewisburg home over the years
Photo: John Bravman
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Glen Tullman ’81 (right) has been a frequent visitor to Professor Candland’s Lewisburg home over the years.
Gift to Honor Mentor Benefits College of Arts & Sciences
by Sherri Kimmel
In a transformative educational experience, a professor plants a seed in the mind of a student — a seed that may take many years to fully flower. Psychology and Animal Behavior Professor Douglas Candland planted this seed in his student, Glen Tullman ’81, and continued for the next 40 years to nurture it. Now Tullman is honoring that enduring relationship with a major gift of $6 million to Bucknell.
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INSIDE ACCESS
Read The Bucknellian’s Reunion edition!
Each year, alumni celebrating reunions write articles for a special edition of The Bucknellian. It’s filled with memories, musings and more. Access the Reunion 2021 digital edition today.
Answer This:
What has been the highlight of your Bison athletics fandom?

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK TO SUBMIT YOUR ANSWER

Continuing Connections
TO ENSURE SAFETY of alumni and friends during the COVID-19 pandemic, Reunion 2021 was held remotely, May 31–June 6. The event drew alumni from around the world. Participants spanned class years from 1945 to 2016, including graduation years ending with 0, 1, 5 or 6 and all emeritus classes. In addition to live online class gatherings and socials, highlights included updates from President John Bravman and Provost Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak; a virtual Reunion Run to Remember 5K to honor and remember military personnel, veterans and deceased class members; tours of campus and downtown Lewisburg; educational sessions with faculty and alumni experts; a wine tasting and charcuterie board creation event; a student life panel discussion; yoga and fitness sessions; career coaching; trivia night; articles written by alumni celebrating a Reunion year; a service of remembrance and more. Additional special events included live remote gatherings for LGBTQA alumni, Black alumni, Global Ambassador Program alumni, biomedical engineering alumni and Alumni Association Board meetings. Access recordings of events at go.bucknell.edu/reunion.
A Whole New View(book)
For decades, high school students’ mailboxes, kitchen tables and bedroom floors have grown cluttered with viewbooks from colleges trying to court them.

Universities identify students that might be a good fit and mail them a thick, glossy overview of their academic, residential and recreational offerings.

These signature admissions pieces are colorful and comprehensive, but there’s one thing they aren’t: customizable.

Witty Winners
Here are our favorite caption submissions from the last issue:
“Bisonseye!”
Wendy Quest Trevisani ’92
“During the Great Arrow Shortage of 1955, two out of three Bucknellians were forced to pantomime during archery practice.”
David Romankow ’90
“The pesky squirrel issue behind Kress has been successfully resolved.”
John O’Connor ’87
“Ethel didn’t want to admit she forgot her arrows in the dorm. #fakeittilyoumakeit.”
Angie Casey Longwell ’05
“Demonstrating the arrow dynamics of aerodynamics.”
Jay Sullivan ’69
“Archery right before lunch? No wonder we call it the hunger games.”
Thomas Hotalen M’70
Submit your caption for the retro photo on Page 61 to bmagazine@bucknell.edu or facebook.com/bucknellu by Aug. 8.
Women using bow and arrows
Photo: Special Collections/University Archives
My Favorite Thing graphic
The Banjo
" " In his San Francisco Bay-area home office, among his Kingston Trio, John Prine and Tim O’Brien albums, DENNIS GALE ’64 has a picture of his first banjo. It reminds him of his early days of playing the instrument at Bucknell. Gale kept strumming through his academic career, which included teaching public affairs and administration at Rutgers and urban planning at Stanford.
Dennis Gale ’64 in 1968, playing the banjo
Photos: Timothy Archibald; Robert Clo
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Dennis Gale ’64 in 1968, playing with the Lower Blackwood Street Ragpickers in Boston. Today, he plays a bluegrass banjo known for its resonator, a dish-shaped wooden backing that projects the sound outward toward the audience.
Dennis Gale ’64 in 1968, playing the banjo
Photos: Timothy Archibald; Robert Clo
" "
Dennis Gale ’64 in 1968, playing with the Lower Blackwood Street Ragpickers in Boston. Today, he plays a bluegrass banjo known for its resonator, a dish-shaped wooden backing that projects the sound outward toward the audience.
The Banjo
" " In his San Francisco Bay-area home office, among his Kingston Trio, John Prine and Tim O’Brien albums, DENNIS GALE ’64 has a picture of his first banjo. It reminds him of his early days of playing the instrument at Bucknell. Gale kept strumming through his academic career, which included teaching public affairs and administration at Rutgers and urban planning at Stanford.
Bucknell definitely played a role in my discovery of bluegrass music and the banjo. When I was a sophomore, Joan Baez performed on campus, and there was such a buzz around the performance. Later, when I heard her on a recording, I realized she was very true to the folk and bluegrass traditions.
On April 27 students participated in an interactive libation and planting ceremony to remember not only lives that were taken in the last year, but to commemorate and honor lives that were lived.

photograph by EMILY PAINE

student participating in an interactive libation and planting ceremony
On April 27 students participated in an interactive libation and planting ceremony to remember not only lives that were taken in the last year, but to commemorate and honor lives that were lived.

photograph by EMILY PAINE

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Thanks for reading our Summer 2021 issue!