Bucknell
Our Pandemic Spring title
Summer 2020
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BY WAY OF BUCKNELL
B STRONG
The Class of 2019 tribute shines in the summer sun.
If you would like a reprint of this photo, please fill out the form at bucknell.edu/bmagazine. We will send you a complimentary 8-by-10 print.
photograph by Emily Paine
BY WAY OF BUCKNELL
B STRONG
The Class of 2019 tribute shines in the summer sun.
If you would like a reprint of this photo, please fill out the form at bucknell.edu/bmagazine. We will send you a complimentary 8-by-10 print.
photograph by Emily Paine
Pathways
From Bucknell to Broadcasting Health News typography

by Eveline Chao

Viv Williams ’86 comes from a medical lineage — her father, Robert Hess Williams ’50, is a fourth-generation physician, and sister Amy Williams Goucher ’80 is a nephrologist. Williams both branched out and stayed in the family business: She’s a freelance broadcast health journalist who also works for the Mayo Clinic News Network, whose stories run on local and network TV around the country.

Her Mayo Clinic segments present “health information that people can use to make their lives better,” Williams says. Lately, that’s included stories on how to protect oneself from COVID-19, and how to maintain mental and physical health while stuck at home. “It’s important to get accurate information out to the public,” says Williams.

Pathways
Pathways with Viv Williams
From Bucknell to Broadcasting Health News typography
by Eveline Chao

Viv Williams ’86 comes from a medical lineage — her father, Robert Hess Williams ’50, is a fourth-generation physician, and sister Amy Williams Goucher ’80 is a nephrologist. Williams both branched out and stayed in the family business: She’s a freelance broadcast health journalist who also works for the Mayo Clinic News Network, whose stories run on local and network TV around the country.

Her Mayo Clinic segments present “health information that people can use to make their lives better,” Williams says. Lately, that’s included stories on how to protect oneself from COVID-19, and how to maintain mental and physical health while stuck at home. “It’s important to get accurate information out to the public,” says Williams.

Pathways
Passing the GED to Earning a PH.D typography

by Matt Hughes

By the time she turned 30, Professor Deborah Sills, civil & environmental engineering, had been many things — a soldier, a backpacker in India, a mom — but a high school graduate wasn’t among them.

Sills dropped out of her school in Israel, where her family relocated from the U.S. when she was 12, amid struggles with anxiety and depression, and a decade later was raising a daughter on her own and working in a natural food co-op in Bozeman, Mont.

Pathways
Pathways with Deborah Sills
Passing the GED to Earning a PH.D typography
by Matt Hughes

By the time she turned 30, Professor Deborah Sills, civil & environmental engineering, had been many things — a soldier, a backpacker in India, a mom — but a high school graduate wasn’t among them.

Sills dropped out of her school in Israel, where her family relocated from the U.S. when she was 12, amid struggles with anxiety and depression, and a decade later was raising a daughter on her own and working in a natural food co-op in Bozeman, Mont.

Gateway
Editor's Letter graphic
Sherri Kimmel, Editor
For questions or comments, contact me at sherri.kimmel@bucknell.edu
Standing Strong

in this age of uncertainty, there is one thing for certain: Bucknellians will stand strong and deliver. Whether it’s a professor flexing first-time online teaching muscles, dance students stitching together steps to create a cohesive video sequence or alumnae overseeing federal drug approvals or shepherding a possible COVID-19 treatment, Bucknellians are giving it their all.

You’ll learn more about all of the aforementioned folks in the following pages, and you’ll read about how the Bucknell campus community came together during the most challenging spring in the University’s 174-year history. While our seniors were not able to enjoy their usual final semester or May Commencement, they are making plans for the future. Read how one outstanding senior grew from her Bucknell international research opportunities to become a confident scholar — and Fulbright recipient.

At press time, calls for racial justice echoed around the globe, in the wake of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis. Those calls were also resounding throughout the Bucknell community. On Page 9, you can read more about actions planned by the University.

In these uncertain times, one thing is certain: As Bucknellians, we will move ahead, strongly, surely and meaningfully.

Letters
RECALLING NISEI CLASSMATES: I enjoyed the articles about Sachi [Mizuki Kuwamoto ’48] and Dotty [Sakasegawa Tabery ’48] and also their pictures [in the Winter 2020 issue]. They were friendly, and we participated in groups like the Christian Association, NAACP as well as special events. Memories fond do go trooping by.
Peggy Rowe Harrison ’48, P’81
Rochester, N.Y.
Forrest Brown Remembered

I am writing about “Fellow Travelers,” an article about Forrest Brown by Sherri Kimmel in the Spring 2020 issue. I am indebted to Mr. Brown for my education at Bucknell. l came to Bucknell in 1951 as a sophomore transfer student from the University of Dubuque. Mr. Brown arranged a full scholarship for me so I could study mechanical engineering. I graduated in 1954 and last saw Mr. Brown in 1963 when he visited me in California. After working in the aerospace industries for 40-some years, I retired in 2000 and now live with my wife in Long Beach, Calif. Our three kids are all happily married and have their own wonderful families.

I visited often at Mr. Brown’s house when I was at Bucknell. I have fond memories of the warm hospitality, which helped me to forget the loneliness of living in a new country. Mr. Brown always helped me to find part-time work and jobs during holidays. I would like to express my deep gratitude and appreciation for his kindness and help extended to me during my years at Bucknell.

As I recall, my father, Tsi-Hsing Wang M’34, a YMCA secretary in Kunming, China, stayed with Mr. Brown’s family in 1932 when he went to Bucknell for his master’s degree. My father revisited Bucknell in 1982 and was sorry that he didn’t get a chance to say goodbye. My father passed away in Los Angeles in 1999.

Tennyson Wang ’54
Long Beach, Calif.
A Useful Education

The article in the Spring 2020 issue about the trees on Bucknell’s campus (“How to Care for Trees and Shrubs”) brought back memories of my own experience. As a commuter student scraping for income, I was fortunate to be part of the maintenance crew at Bucknell during breaks and vacations.

I mention this because, looking back over the intervening years, I find that I learned more useful lessons while working with the maintenance crews than I did in the classroom. (This will come as no shock to any of my professors or to anyone looking at my GPA.) I also learned a trade. I wired much of Memorial Stadium after a fire there, and to the best of my knowledge, there have been no subsequent disasters from that.

I would like to thank all of the men (there were only men then) who patiently put up with my immaturity and taught me lessons about life and working with people that have served me so well all of these years. They also gave me an electrical skill set that has been quite helpful around the house and made me very popular with neighbors. The classroom work was important, and my resulting degree is what opened the doors needed to create the career in international logistics that I have much enjoyed. All graduates got that career preparation. For some lucky few of us, however, our Bucknell education was much broader. My thanks to all those people who were so valuable to me.

Bill Seidel ’62
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Letters Policy

Bucknell Magazine welcomes letters to the editor addressing topics covered in the magazine. Although criticism of the University and its policies is acceptable, no letters containing potentially libelous statements or personal attacks will be printed.

The editors reserve the final decision to publish and edit any letter — there is no guarantee that all letters received will be published.

All letters must be signed. The maximum length is 300 words. The editors reserve the right to edit letters for clarity and space. Writers may be asked to submit revised versions of letters or to approve editorial changes made by the Bucknell Magazine editor. After two issues, the debate on any topic will conclude. Views expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors or the official views or policies of the University.

Table of Contents
The Class of 2019 tribute shines in the summer sun.
From Bucknell to broadcasting and from GED to Ph.D.
GATEWAY
Our readers share their thoughts.
Researchers address coal-region medical challenges.
In Lewisburg and far afield, Bucknell’s students and staff make a positive and palpable difference.
Ceremony expected to occur next spring.
Bucknellians speak out for meaningful change in turbulent times.
Bucknell engineers PPE for health care providers.
Dynamic new display in the works in Gerhard Fieldhouse.
Professor Gary Steiner reveals his faves.
Yankees scout Matt Daley ’04 shares his pick for a dream signing.
Professor Reggie Paxton Gazes ’04 teaches Communicating Science to Non-scientists.
Chris Tanabe ’21 was building his reputation as a golfer when COVID-19 hit.
Career Center’s Megan Wolleben tells how to win at video interviews.
Donation of ancient maps will advance classroom learning.
Hal Richman ’58’s Strat-O-Matic baseball board game soars in COVID time.
FEATURES
Through the COVID-19 crisis, crux of community continues for Bucknell.
Alumni rallied in many ways to help during the COVID-19 crisis.
Emotionally challenging experiences led to personal growth for graduating senior.
’RAY BUCKNELL
Navigating the Unknown.
In Shaken Brain, Elizabeth Sandel ’71 reveals the risks of traumatic brain injuries.
Peter Murchison ’73, P’02 advocates for actions against gun violence.
Science education for youngsters is Gerald Bauldock ’79’s focus.
Entrepreneur Pete Kadens ’00 helps Toledo teens advance to college.
Anne Glazer Cohen ’07 makes beautiful music at an elementary school in New York City.
John Abdou M’09 aims to make USA Water Polo a real player.
Christina Sfedu ’12 helps navigate new frontiers at SpaceX.
Michael Reynolds ’06 and Henna Wang ’10 enhance museum experiences.
Bucknellians make their mark in theatre work.
Passion Artis ’14 lives by the numbers.
Remember your friends, family and classmates.
Your opportunities to get involved.
Encourage admitted students with B2B: Bison to Bison.
Virtual Reunion brought together alumni from around the world.
Richard Rinehart conceived the Community Art Wall.
ON THE COVER:
Despite the emergence of COVID-19 this spring, Bucknell kept keeping on.

Illustration by Gwen Keraval

ON THE BACK COVER:
Workers place the last beam on the new Freeman College of Management/Art & Art History Building.

Photo by Emily Paine

Bucknell

magazine

Volume 13, Issue 3

Vice President for Communications
Gail Glover

Senior Director of Content Strategy
Heather Johns

Editor
Sherri Kimmel

Design
Amy Wells

Associate Editor
Matt Hughes

class notes editor
Heidi Hormel

Contributors
Brad Tufts
Emily Paine
Brooke Thames
Bryan Wendell

Editorial Assistants
Kim Faulk
Miyah Powe ’20
Julia Stevens ’20

Website
bucknell.edu/bmagazine

Contact
Email: bmagazine@bucknell.edu
Class Notes:
classnotes@bucknell.edu
Telephone: 570-577-3611

Bucknell Magazine
(ISSN 1044-7563), of which this is volume 13, number 3, is published in winter, spring, summer and fall by Bucknell University, One Dent Drive, Lewisburg, PA 17837. Periodicals Postage paid at Lewisburg, PA and additional mailing offices.
Permit No. 068-880.

Circulation
53,000

Postmaster
Send all address changes to:
Office of Records,
301 Market St., Suite 2
Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837
© 2020 Bucknell University
Please recycle after use.

Mix Paper from responsible sources
woman walking down the sidewalk in Mt. Carmel smoking a cigarette
Photo: Emily Paine
" "
Many of the women interviewed for the research project live in Mt. Carmel, a coal town that has been in decline for decades.
Health Hardships
by Brooke Thames
For several years, Bucknell faculty and students have worked diligently to bring hope to residents of the economically distressed coal region 40 miles from campus. Efforts to revitalize downtown business districts, organize food pantries and sponsor sports camps have been among the Bucknell-driven projects designed to fuel recovery.

Now, in partnership with the Geisinger health care system, a team of five undergraduate students are learning firsthand about the challenges residents face in receiving quality health care. Students interviewed 40 women from the Mt. Carmel and Shamokin, Pa., area about their health care experiences. Their voices will be incorporated within the data found in their medical records so that doctors may better address patient needs and concerns.

news ticker
A WISE INVESTMENT
In May, U.S. News & World Report ranked Bucknell among the top 20 U.S. colleges and universities offering the best return on investment. Based on research from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, a Bucknell degree was found to have an average payback of more than $1.4 million after 40 years.
TUITION ON ICE
In light of the financial toll that COVID-19 has taken on many students and their families, Bucknell announced in April it would freeze tuition at the 2019-20 rate for all students for the 2020-21 academic year.
WELCOME BACK, STUDENTS
Bucknell plans to resume in-person classes Aug. 17, a week earlier than usual, and conclude the fall semester on Nov. 20, with no Fall Break. The changes to the fall semester schedule were made to reduce risks of COVID-19 transmission on campus.
AROUND TOWN AND AROUND THE GLOBE
’burg and Beyond
In Lewisburg and far afield, Bucknell’s students and staff make a positive and palpable difference.
Jillian Flynn with sunflowers
Photo: Emma Battle ’22
" "
Jillian Flynn ’22 looks forward to taking prekindergarteners on nature walks again.
" "Lewisburg, Pa.
Jillian Flynn ’22’s experience with children’s musical theatre goes back to her first on-stage performance at age 5. So it was only natural that she would choose to work with kids for her Presidential Fellowship at Bucknell, helping local prekindergarten children learn about the environment through music.
AROUND TOWN AND AROUND THE GLOBE
’burg and Beyond
In Lewisburg and far afield, Bucknell’s students and staff make a positive and palpable difference.
Caroline Hromy in front of the  Reichstag building in Berlin
Photo: Julia Stevens ’20
" "
Caroline Hromy ’21 in front of the Reichstag building in Berlin.
" "Oświęcim, Poland
In January, history major Caroline Hromy ’21 attended the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau at the actual site of the Polish concentration camp. The trip was an extension of research she began last fall with Professor David Del Testa, history, on the portrayal of Holocaust victims in museums and memorials.
Commencement Postponed
Seniors were celebrated in July, but pandemic delays official graduation ceremony
by Brooke Thames
fire pit
fire pit
Photos: Gordon Wenzel; Daniel Earhart
" "
Top: The Class of 2020 gathered Oct. 21, 2016, in Rooke Chapel for First Night, an event that symbolizes the start of first-year students’ lifelong journey as Bucknellians. Above: The senior class tribute was a fire pit.
With deep regret shared by many in the Bucknell community, University President John Bravman announced in June the rescheduling of the Class of 2020 Commencement ceremony for spring 2021, due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Originally set for May 17, the ceremony had been moved to July 19, but as the latter date approached, it became clear that state COVID-19 guidelines would likely prohibit large gatherings of people through the summer months.

Intent on honoring the Class of 2020 despite the physical distance, Bucknell students, faculty, administrators and alumni came together virtually for an online Commencement celebration on July 19. Video messages from Bravman, Provost Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak, former Save the Children CEO and keynote speaker Carolyn Speer Miles ’83, P’14, and student speaker Brishti Mandal ’20 spoke to the achievements and character of the class.

‘We Can Beat This Together’
Bucknellians speak out for meaningful change in turbulent times
by Sherri Kimmel
Local business owner Nisan Trotter ’05 speaks at a Lewisburg rally on June 13.
Photo: Emily Paine
" "
Local business owner Nisan Trotter ’05 speaks at a Lewisburg rally on June 13.
Nisan Trotter ’05 paced the gazebo stage in Lewisburg’s Hufnagle Park on June 13, looking out over a crowd of 500 people representing, as he observed, “Generation Z, mixed with baby boomers, mixed with millennials — all holding Black Lives Matter signs. The Moral Majority can no longer be the silent majority. We all need to fight systemic racism.”

While Trotter and Atakora Appiah-Padi ’20 were two Bucknellians who spoke at the park rally sponsored by the local social justice organization If Not Us, Then Who?, other members of the Bucknell community were expressing themselves by other means, with a focus on how Bucknell could more actively address racial injustice, diversity, equity and inclusion.

For the Greater Good
Bucknell engineers PPE for health care providers
by MATT HUGHES
Brandon Vogel poses beneath the framework of an incubation tent.
Rachel Michael ’20 and Professor Eric Kennedy worked on a reusable N95 respirator mask.
Photos: Erin Jablonski, Eric Kennedy
" "
 Left: Professor Brandon Vogel poses beneath the framework of an incubation tent. Above: Rachel Michael ’20 and Professor Eric Kennedy worked on a reusable N95 respirator mask.
" "
Top: Professor Brandon Vogel poses beneath the framework of an incubation tent. Above: Rachel Michael ’20 and Professor Eric Kennedy worked on a reusable N95 respirator mask.

Every year, Bucknell engineering students and professors put their skills to work for the greater good, whether they’re partnering with local businesses on projects that support jobs or creating eyeglasses for impoverished children in the Global South. This spring, their efforts took on greater importance than ever, as the college joined the nationwide effort to protect caregivers on the front line of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Professor Brandon Vogel, chemical engineering, devised an intubation tent that safeguards doctors when they place patients on ventilators and donated the devices to Evangelical Community Hospital in Lewisburg. Professor Eric Kennedy, biomedical engineering, and his student Rachel Michael ’20 worked on a reusable plastic facemask with space to mount a disposable N95 filter cartridge. And many others, including mechanical engineering professor Nate Siegel and student workers at Bucknell’s makerspaces, created face shields for doctors and nurses, fabricating parts with 3D printers both on campus and in their own homes. Mechanical engineering major Xander Karpowicz ’22 even sought out 3D printers from a local high school to create shields for a hospital near his home in Lehighton, Pa.

Hall of Fame Gets a Major Update
by Jon Terry ’93
The Bucknell Athletics Hall of Fame was founded in 1979 to honor the very best from the long and proud history of Bison athletics. The incomparable Christy Mathewson, Class of 1902, headlined the 10-person inaugural class, and every year since, a new group has been formally inducted on Homecoming Weekend. As of this fall, the Hall of Fame will number 277 men and women, comprising former student-athletes, coaches and administrators.

The current location of the Hall of Fame is rather obscure for such luminaries. Black-and-white portraits of the athletic greats line a long, dim corridor on the second floor of Gerhard Fieldhouse. Visitors are unlikely to stumble upon the display without asking for directions. But that remoteness is soon to change.

This spring, the Department of Athletics & Recreation began an entirely donor-driven project that will give the Hall of Fame not just a new home but a new vitality. The display will be located on the second-floor landing inside the Kenneth Langone Athletics and Recreation Center — a high-traffic area at the crossroads of Davis Gym, the Krebs Family Fitness Center and the department’s administrative offices.

Instead of rows of static portraits, there will be a colorful celebration of Bison athletics history, featuring interactive touchscreens that allow visitors to gain a more detailed look at each inductee and access photos and videos.

“A new Hall of Fame presentation is something that we have envisioned for many years, and we are so thankful to the [anonymous] donors who have made this concept a reality,” says Todd Newcomb, chair of the Hall of Fame Committee. “The Hall of Fame celebrates the very best and brightest in Bucknell Athletics annals, and we are proud to be able to showcase these individuals in a manner in which they deserve.”

The new Hall of Fame area is slated to open on Homecoming Weekend 2020.

What I'm Reading Logo for Bucknell Magazine
Clip art of Gary Steiner, Professor of Philosophy
Gary Steiner
Professor of Philosophy
Dennis Lehane, The Given Day Cover
Dennis Lehane, The Given Day.
Lehane has a terrific knack for interweaving plot lines and developing characters in ways that give the reader a vivid insight into specific times and places. The time and place of this novel is Boston during and shortly after the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918. Lehane explores race relations, police and political corruption, and the country’s fascination with baseball all in one tightly crafted narrative.
William Faulkner, Light in August Cover
William Faulkner, Light in August.
Faulkner is a novelist with the extraordinary ability to write in a manner that reflects the doubt and uncertainty of modernity: One never quite knows exactly what is going on at any given point in his narratives, and yet one continually gets intimations of what lies just beyond the reach of intelligibility. Here Faulkner deftly explores the ambiguities of racial identity and paternity through a series of relationships revolving around the unforgettable character Joe Christmas.
W.G. Sebald, On the Natural History of Destruction Cover
W.G. Sebald, On the Natural History of Destruction.
Sebald confronts the question of why German writers in the decades following the Second World War failed to confront the hideous consequences of the Allied bombings of cities such as Munich, in some notable cases constructing self-aggrandizing narratives of themselves that obscured their actual relationship to National Socialism. Not for the faint of heart, this book addresses both the specific details of the bombings and the moral failings of some very famous writers.
What I'm Reading Logo for Bucknell Magazine
Clip art of Gary Steiner, Professor of Philosophy
Gary Steiner
Professor of Philosophy
Dennis Lehane, The Given Day Cover
Dennis Lehane, The Given Day.
Lehane has a terrific knack for interweaving plot lines and developing characters in ways that give the reader a vivid insight into specific times and places. The time and place of this novel is Boston during and shortly after the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918. Lehane explores race relations, police and political corruption, and the country’s fascination with baseball all in one tightly crafted narrative.
William Faulkner, Light in August Cover
William Faulkner, Light in August.
Faulkner is a novelist with the extraordinary ability to write in a manner that reflects the doubt and uncertainty of modernity: One never quite knows exactly what is going on at any given point in his narratives, and yet one continually gets intimations of what lies just beyond the reach of intelligibility. Here Faulkner deftly explores the ambiguities of racial identity and paternity through a series of relationships revolving around the unforgettable character Joe Christmas.
W.G. Sebald, On the Natural History of Destruction Cover
W.G. Sebald, On the Natural History of Destruction.
Sebald confronts the question of why German writers in the decades following the Second World War failed to confront the hideous consequences of the Allied bombings of cities such as Munich, in some notable cases constructing self-aggrandizing narratives of themselves that obscured their actual relationship to National Socialism. Not for the faint of heart, this book addresses both the specific details of the bombings and the moral failings of some very famous writers.
Pop Quiz
Matt
Daley ’04
Former Yankees pitcher Matt Daley ’04 now scouts for the team.
Photos: New York Yankees; Wikimedia Commons
Former Yankees pitcher Matt Daley ’04 now scouts for the team.
Yankees Scout, Former Big Leaguer

After his five-year Major League Baseball career ended in 2014, Matt Daley ’04 knew he wanted to stay in the game in some capacity. The former pitcher — he recorded 98 strikeouts in 100 innings with the Colorado Rockies and the New York Yankees — was offered a scouting job with the “Bronx Bombers,” traveling America’s back roads in search of the next great talent. Daley fell in love with the role. Today, he works out of the Yankees’ front office as director of pro scouting.

Cool Class clipart
Communicating Science to Non-scientists
Communicating Science to Non-scientists
What Class?
Communicating Science to Non-scientists
Who Teaches It?
Professor Reggie Paxton Gazes ’04, psychology and animal behavior

“During their time on campus, Bucknell science majors become experts in communicating science to scientific audiences. But once they graduate, most of the people they will encounter — their grandmother, their co-workers, their 4-year-old niece — will not share their scientific backgrounds. I designed my new SciComm course to help students learn how to effectively talk about science with these audiences.

COVID-19 hasn’t kept record-setting golfer Chris Tanabe ’21 from working on his game.
Photo: Marc Hagemeier
Par for the Course
by Andrew Faught

There’s nothing like a pandemic to disrupt a record- setting amateur golf career. Chris Tanabe ’21 can attest to that.

Tanabe was building his reputation as an elite collegiate golfer when the COVID-19 outbreak in March forced the cancellation of Bucknell’s season. In February at the Loyola Invitational in Arizona, Tanabe helped the Bison break the team 54-hole scoring record with an 858 (six below par). At the Dartmouth Invitational, he finished with a school-record nine-under 133 for 36 holes.

The team was practicing during spring break in West Palm Beach, Fla., when they learned the season — after just two tournaments — was over.

Ask the Expert text
How To Win At Video Interviews
Illustration of Megan Wolleben
Illustration: Joel Kimmel

" "Even before the outbreak of the coronavirus forced most companies to operate remotely, many employers used videoconferencing to complete initial candidate screenings. Some even used Skype, Zoom or Google Hangouts to conduct mid- to late-round interviews with applicants from around the world.

In her role at Bucknell’s Center for Career Advancement, Megan Wolleben helps students prepare for these remote interviews. Her advice can benefit any current or future job-seeker.

Steven Horowitz with a framed map
" "
Steven Horowitz ’62, with a representative of the donated collection that he says demonstrates the greatest cartographic mistake ever made, that of picturing California as an island.
SUPPORTING STUDENT INQUIRY
The Ancient World, Revealed
Donation of historic maps will provide classroom and research opportunities
by Brooke Thames
S

teven Horowitz ’62’s fascination with maps began in the front seat of his father’s car. Growing up in the 1950s, the New York City native often sat up front on long drives through the mountains while vacationing in the Catskills — his parents on either side of him, a roadmap on his lap.

Map from 1746 showing the Colorado River making a “left” turn
Photos: Steven Horowitz ’62
" "
This map, which Steven Horowitz ’62 donated to Bucknell, is from 1746 and shows the Colorado River making a “left” turn. That’s because the cartographers at the time were not sure if California was an island or not, he says.
Q&A
Illustration of Hal Richman ’58
Illustration: Joel Kimmel
Hal Richman ’58
Keeping Baseball Top of Mind in COVID Time
by Matt Zencey
Hal Richman ’58 invented the legendary baseball board game, Strat-O-Matic, which simulates what it’s like to manage a game played by a real Major League team. First issued in 1961 and still sold by his company, Richman’s game enjoyed a resurgence this spring when the COVID-19 pandemic shut down baseball and other professional team sports. Each day of the baseball shutdown, his firm has run a computer simulation of the scheduled games and posted results for thousands of fans on the internet. At 83, he still has a hand in the business, working 16 hours a week.
Features
AN INDEPENDENT SCHOLAR Julia Stevens ’20 in Ypres, Belgium, one of her research sites
photograph by Andreas Krueger
Features
AN INDEPENDENT SCHOLAR Julia Stevens ’20 in Ypres, Belgium, one of her research sites
photograph by Andreas Krueger
photograph by Andreas Krueger
Features
AN INDEPENDENT SCHOLAR Julia Stevens ’20 in Ypres, Belgium, one of her research sites
photograph by Andreas Krueger
photograph by Andreas Krueger
Our
Pandemic
Spring
Through the COVID-19 crisis,
crux of community continues for Bucknell
by Matt Hughes
illustration by gwen keraval
Our Pandemic Spring
Through the COVID-19 crisis, crux of community continues for Bucknell
by Matt Hughes
illustration by gwen keraval

S

omething about a cherry blossom abhors solitude. From the ancient alleyways of Tokyo’s Sensoji Temple to the banks of the Potomac to Bucknell’s own Malesardi Quad, their audacious pink blossoms draw us from our winter’s seclusion to convene and reconnect beneath their boughs. In late April on Bucknell’s campus, the Kwanzan double cherry blossoms were again in full bloom outside Bertrand Library, but their pageantry was different this year. The revelers were absent, the quad and buildings around them silent.

This was a different spring for Bucknellians, as it was for everyone else. All but a fraction of students had left campus, and employees and alumni were staying away too, in efforts to protect one another. All have suffered; some much more than others. But alongside the pain of physical absence there was also hope, community and creativity that shone through. Working through these unprecedented challenges together but apart, the University community — students, professors, alumni alike — awaited the day when it could reunite beneath those stunning fuchsia blooms, as different and changed people, perhaps, but maybe closer than before.

A History of Disruptions
Wars, strikes, extreme weather and global pandemics — during its 174 years in Lewisburg, Bucknell University has endured them all. As the University prepares to rebound from COVID-19, other interruptions come to mind.
The Civil War

The Civil War came to Pennsylvania in June 1863 when Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Confederate Army approached Gettysburg. At the University at Lewisburg, which became Bucknell in 1886, classes were still in session. Students stopped what they were doing to prepare to fight — 36 joined in.

Classes were suspended for six weeks, though the Female Institute and the Academy (a separate program that educated younger male students) remained open. Once the danger subsided, the men returned to Lewisburg, just in time for Commencement on July 30, 1863. While ceremony attendance was lower than usual, one observer said it “will ever be regarded as one of the very noblest in the history of the institution.”

Difference Makers
Alumni rallied in many ways to help during the COVID-19 crisis
When the coronavirus upended our world this spring, it wasn’t long before word began filtering back to Bucknell about the many alumni who were engaged in courageous and selfless work during the crisis. Others, like Ryan Nach ’07, who produced the song “Saving Us,” sought to highlight and honor the sacrifices of front-line health-care workers. We salute 15 Bucknell difference makers in the following stories.
Medical Matters
The Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research headquarters in Silver Spring, Md., is normally a buzzing hive of government workers dedicated to keeping drugs safe, effective and available. This spring, only the queen bee could be found inside. While her staff was working remotely Director Janet Woodcock ’70 was all alone, striving to fast track approval of possible treatments for COVID-19.
Difference Makers featured illustration of FDA, FEMA, and CDC connections
illustrations by gwen keraval
Difference Makers
Alumni rallied in many ways to help during the COVID-19 crisis
When the coronavirus upended our world this spring, it wasn’t long before word began filtering back to Bucknell about the many alumni who were engaged in courageous and selfless work during the crisis. Others, like Ryan Nach ’07, who produced the song “Saving Us,” sought to highlight and honor the sacrifices of front-line health-care workers. We salute 15 Bucknell difference makers in the following stories.
Medical Matters
The Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research headquarters in Silver Spring, Md., is normally a buzzing hive of government workers dedicated to keeping drugs safe, effective and available. This spring, only the queen bee could be found inside. While her staff was working remotely Director Janet Woodcock ’70 was all alone, striving to fast track approval of possible treatments for COVID-19.
Julia Stevens ’20, during her second visit to Paris with the Bucknellians in World War I research team.
A Scholar Is Born title
Emotionally challenging experiences led to personal growth and cultural competence for graduating senior
by Julia Stevens ’20
Difference Makers featured illustration of FDA, FEMA, and CDC connections
Julia Stevens ’20, during her second visit to Paris with the Bucknellians in World War I research team.
Photo: Andreas Krueger
A Scholar Is Born title
Emotionally challenging experiences led to personal growth and cultural competence for graduating senior
by Julia Stevens ’20
Photo: Andreas Krueger
It is safe to say that the spring 2020 semester did not end as planned. On March 10, President John Bravman sent an email informing Bucknellians that the University would be transitioning to remote learning in an effort to combat the coronavirus pandemic.
The collective reaction to the news was a mixture of confusion, sadness and even anger. Students — particularly seniors such as I — understandably felt that we had been denied many of the experiences we were anticipating. However, as I find myself unexpectedly back in my childhood bedroom, I’ve noticed something. Rather than fixating on those lost experiences, I’m reflecting on the incredible opportunities that I had through Bucknell.
Julia’s Journeys
Peter Stokes ’21 places a pennant on a Bucknellian’s grave in France.
Julia Stevens ’20 took many memorable photos during her Bucknell-sponsored travels. Left: Peter Stokes ’21 places a pennant on a Bucknellian’s grave in France. Right: The American monument at Château-Thierry in France.
Julia Stevens ’20 took many memorable photos during her Bucknell-sponsored travels. Left: Peter Stokes ’21 places a pennant on a Bucknellian’s grave in France. Below: The American monument at Château-Thierry in France.
Julia Stevens ’20 took many memorable photos during her Bucknell-sponsored travels. Above: Peter Stokes ’21 places a pennant on a Bucknellian’s grave in France. Below: The American monument at Château-Thierry in France.
The American monument at Château-Thierry in France.
A shrine in Uji, Japan.
Left: A shrine in Uji, Japan. Right: Debris in a French town abandoned after World War I. Below: The entranceway to Auschwitz.
Above: A shrine in Uji, Japan. Right: Debris in a French town abandoned after World War I. Below: The entranceway to Auschwitz.
Above: A shrine in Uji, Japan. Below: Debris in a French town abandoned after World War I. The entranceway to Auschwitz.
Debris in a French town abandoned after World War I.
Each of these travels was just as crucial as any of the classes on my transcript to my development as a student and as a person.”
Julia Stevens ’20
The entranceway to Auschwitz.
COMING UP ROSES Malesardi Quad shimmers in the summer sun.
photograph by Emily Paine
From the President department heading
Illustration of John C. Bravman, President
Illustration: Joel Kimmel
Navigating the Unknown
As I write this column in mid-May, COVID-19 continues to devastate families and communities, hospitals and schools, businesses and governments. Every one of us has been affected by the pandemic, some more than others. Indeed, the only certainty for the second half of 2020 is continued uncertainty.

Higher education was grappling with unsustainable financial models and shifting demographics long before the virus emerged. The global outbreak of COVID-19 has dramatically accelerated a looming crisis, threatening the safety of students and the delivery of education. Every institution, including Bucknell, is dealing with unprecedented challenges in the face of the unknown. Many of those challenges will be fiscal in nature.

Book Talk
Shaken Brain book cover by Dr. Elizabeth Sandel ’71
Combating Concussions
by Sherri Kimmel
If COVID-19 is sometimes referred to as the invisible enemy, then concussions may be equivalently defined as the invisible injury. If you have an elderly parent or a toddler, have a child playing a contact sport or are a road-bike warrior yourself, you may already be personally aware of how prevalent concussions are.

As author and physician Elizabeth Sandel ’71 notes in Shaken Brain, “one-quarter of Americans reported having a concussion at some point in their lives, and close to 30% [of those injured] said they have suffered from long-term effects, most commonly headaches.”

ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN
When Sandel began treating traumatic brain injuries in the 1980s, most of her patients sustained concussions during motor-vehicle accidents. “But with all of the safety features in cars and other vehicles, that percentage has gone down, and now the largest percentage [40%] is falls,” she says.
Shaken Brain book cover by Dr. Elizabeth Sandel ’71
Dr. Elizabeth Sandel ’71 reveals the risks and the prevalence of traumatic brain injuries
" "
Bucknell religion major Dr. Elizabeth Sandel ’71 reveals the risks and the prevalence of traumatic brain injuries.
Bucknellians Fuel Front-line Workers During the Pandemic
by Monica Baeckstrom Toomey ’89

COVID-19 has changed life for all of us, and whether you are on the front lines or staying home, it has brought a new level of uncertainty and fear to daily life. We may feel hopeless or helpless at times, but how we view and react to our circumstances is always our choice. I am grateful to have Bucknell friends who always try to find solutions and remain positive rather than focusing on things that are out of their control. During the pandemic, some alumnae friends and I chose to serve our communities by each starting a Front Line Appreciation Group (FLAG) initiative, which bring meals to the front-line medical community while also supporting local restaurants.

Monica Baeckstrom Toomey ’89, Tammy Farrow Greenspan ’89 and Shelly Ayres Osterberg ’89 got together at their 30th reunion in 2019
" "
From left: Monica Baeckstrom Toomey ’89, Tammy Farrow Greenspan ’89 and Shelly Ayres Osterberg ’89 got together at their 30th Reunion in 2019.
Alumni Photo Gallery
Images will scroll automatically

1975 – Bikes

Nancy Quay Bradley ’75 (far right) and Nancy Evans Armstrong ’75, along with their husbands, reunite in Venice Fla., for a bike ride.

1975 – Sarasota

JoAnn Patrick-Ezzel ’75 (right) and Nancy Quay Bradley ’75 (left) reconnect in Sarasota, Fla.

Golfing — ’72-’76

Despite the pandemic, alumni kept their annual golf outing going on May 30 by practicing physical distancing. At the first tee, from left: Bob Schowalter ’74, Chuck Resnick ’72, Bryan Snapp ’72, Craig Sloat ’76, Ron Mandel ’76, Alan Grochal ’74, Rick Frazier ’74, Tom Hannan ’73, Larry Kirschner ’73, Don Labowsky ’74 (who organized the event) and Pam Stephani ’74 (Pam’s husband, Dick Morelli also played). This was the 24th edition of the Sigma Phi Epsilon Fossil Golf Outing.

Catch up with Bucknell alumni in pictures.

Submit your own photos to Bucknell Magazine by contacting your class reporter or emailing classnotes@bucknell.edu

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WAYFINDER
Peter Murchison ’73, P’02
As a Bucknell electrical engineer, my four years of labs and classes required a lot of work — especially the dreaded 8 a.m. classes I seemed to have every semester. To get through it (and leave time to play guitar in a five-piece blues band, B.C. Bone) required me to develop skills that have had a lifelong benefit.

My main job after Bucknell was with IBM, where I worked for 36 years, sometimes traveling the world, including living and working in China for a decade. When I started in 1981, IBM, like many major corporations back then, gave employees extensive training for a year. I joked that they hired me as a Bucknell engineer not because of my engineering knowhow, but because the degree proved I possessed the nose-to-the-grindstone attitude they wanted on their team. Being a Bucknell electrical engineer taught me problem-solving: how to identify key questions, prioritize approaches to solutions and work hard to implement those solutions.

Peter Murchison ’73, P’02 with weapons voluntarily turned in at a gun buyback in Norwalk, Conn., in October 2019
Photo: Sean M. Higgins
Peter Murchison ’73, P’02 with weapons voluntarily turned in at a gun buyback in Norwalk, Conn., in October 2019.
PROFILE
Drawing on Chemistry
Science education for youngsters is Gerald Bauldock ’79’s focus
by Brooke Thames

When he began making drawings years ago to help his toddler son learn the basics of chemistry, Gerald Bauldock ’79 didn’t imagine where those sketches would lead him. “When I began creating my own illustrations, I quickly realized I had stumbled onto something wholly original,” he reflects.

What began as a home project for the Bucknell chemical engineering major has blossomed into Kids for Chemistry, a series of educational books designed to teach young children chemistry fundamentals. The first book, self-published in December, is based on Bauldock’s patented renderings of periodic elements as atoms. Unlike the diagrams typically featured in textbooks, Bauldock says his depictions can help children as young as 10 understand complex concepts, such as orbitals and electrons, that most people don’t encounter until high school.

Gerald Bauldock ’79 has developed a science series for young children
Photo: Emily Paine
Gerald Bauldock ’79 has developed a science series for young children
PROFILE
The Gift of Education
Entrepreneur Pete Kadens ’00 helps Toledo teens advance to college
by Brooke Thames

Pete Kadens ’00 believes that to whom much is given, much is expected. The political science major admits that he didn’t find his way to Bucknell by way of intellect or talent alone but, in large part, because of the opportunities he was afforded. Now, as a businessman who retired after founding three highly profitable companies in the sales, solar and legal marijuana industries, Kadens feels a responsibility to pay his success forward.

In January, Kadens visited a high school in his hometown, Toledo, Ohio, pledging to pay full college tuition, room and board, book fees and other costs for 108 seniors. He also promised to fund one parent of each Scott High School student to attend college or trade school. It’s a donation that will total approximately $3 million.

Pete Kadens ’00 hopes his donation provides inspiration for fellow Bucknellians to give back.
Photo: Courtesy of Green Thumb Industries
Pete Kadens ’00 hopes his donation provides inspiration for fellow Bucknellians to give back.
Flashback
Anne Glazer Cohen ’07
Photo: Isaiah Tanenbaum
Making Beautiful Music
Anne Glazer Cohen ’07 is the founding director of music at Washington Heights and Inwood Music Community Charter School. The music-based elementary school in New York City is founded on the principles of El Sistema, a free program in classical music for young children from lower-income backgrounds. For 13 years the Bucknell music major has worked in urban music education, teacher development and school leadership.
1. How did Bucknell shape your career?
I entered Bucknell with a fairly straightforward career path in mind: I wanted to be a band director. Bucknell not only trained me to be an effective music educator but gave me the toolkit that allowed my career to grow beyond the walls of a classroom.
PROFILE
Making a Big Splash
John Abdou M’09 aims to make USA Water Polo a real player
by Benjamin Gleisser

John Abdou M’09, chief high performance officer at USA Water Polo, describes the sport as a combination of basketball and swimming — except you can’t dribble in a pool.

For the uninitiated, water polo is a game where players try to throw a ball into the opposing team’s floating goal, passing the ball back and forth and jockeying for position in the water as they go. USA Water Polo, the nation’s governing body for the sport, prepares teams for international competitions, including the Olympics.

Abdou, a member of his high school’s basketball and swim teams, played water polo one summer, and “I was forever hooked,” he says. “The sport combined lots of things I loved — being outside, being in a pool, being on a team and playing something similar to basketball.”

John Abdou M’09
Photo: Courtesy of USA Water Polo
The postponement of this summer’s Olympics will allow more time for his team to prepare, says John Abdou M’09.
PROFILE
Rocket Woman
Christina Sfedu ’12 helps navigate new frontiers at SpaceX
by Eveline Chao

At her first job after Bucknell, with Boeing, Christina Sfedu ’12 worked on a satellite that was launched into space on a rocket. Now with the space transportation company SpaceX, she’s helping launch that same rocket into space herself. It might sound like fate, but Sfedu admits her choice to work for Boeing in Los Angeles was based on a whim: “I picked it based on location,” she says with a laugh.

At Boeing, Sfedu was a lead telemetry and command systems engineer, designing the system that allows operators on the ground to talk to a satellite while it orbits around the Earth.

Christina Sfedu ’12
Photo: Malcolm Gibson
Christina Sfedu ’12 enjoys the California lifestyle with her dog, Ollie.
Entrepreneur Spotlight
Michael Reynolds and Henna Wang
Photo: Colleen Jose
Michael Reynolds ’06 and Henna Wang ’10 co-founded Gesso.
Gesso
by Lori Ferguson
Henna Wang ’10 knows the challenges of making a strange place feel more like home. As a child, she moved between Taiwan and the United States, an itinerant existence that sharpened her appreciation for the inherent power of culture to connect.

Now the economics and art history major is drawing on her experience to guide the creation of Gesso, a mobile platform that features site-specific podcasts and audio guides to museums and cultural institutions, and innovative walking tours around New York City. Wang co-founded the company with her spouse, Michael Reynolds ’06, and friend Demetrio Filocamo. The team launched the app in spring 2019, and their business continues to evolve.

Career
Clusters
After finding an artistic home at Bucknell, theatre & dance alumni are exploring performance from backstage, behind the camera and everywhere in between as they collaborate to create new works, new experiences and new insights.
Career Clusters graphic
Career Clusters graphic
PROFILE
The Budget Maven
Passion Artis ’14 lives by the numbers
by Matt Hughes
At Bucknell, Passion Artis ’14 overloaded her schedule to meet the rigorous course requirements she’d need to earn her CPA. But the accounting & financial management major still found room for classes in theatre and dance that remain some of her fondest college memories.

Today, Artis keeps her love for numbers and the arts alive as a finance operations business partner with Netflix, where she tracks film costs and streamlines publicity spending for the leading streaming entertainment service.

portrait of Passion Artis
Photo: Maurniece Gayles
Passion Artis ’14 has parlayed her financial savvy into her first book.
IN MEMORIAM
Remember your friends, family, classmates and others by posting a comment on our online Book of Remembrance. Go to bucknell.edu/bmagazine.
1939
Irene Harnish Guyer M’40, March 5, Town and Country, Mo.
1941
Dorothy Derr Snyder P’74, P’75, G’12, June 12, 2019, Carmichael, Calif.

Leslie Whitney P’68, P’70, P’77, Jan. 11, Glen Mills, Pa.

1943
Lois Henneberger, March 18, Greencastle, Pa.
1945
Jo Ridgeway Haase, May 6, 2016, Silver Spring, Md.
1946
Joseph Doane, Jan. 15, West Palm Beach, Fla.
1948
Bob Appelbaum, Jan. 29, Newtown, Pa.
Bob Guempel P’76, P’92, G’06, G’09, G’13, Jan. 31, Point Pleasant, N.J.
Ernie Simon, Jan. 28, Boynton Beach, Fla.
Helen Busing Skove, Aug. 30, New Smyrna Beach, Fla.
1949
Lynn Harer Frazier P’80, P’82, April 3, Williamsport, Pa.
Madelyn Businell Gloisten P’83, P’84, Dec. 27, 2011, Setauket, N.Y.
Jacob Wolansky P’80, Jan. 28, Wellington, Fla.
1950
Lois Dial Adams M’52, Feb. 26, Newark, Del.
Bill Cole P’80, March 18, Northumberland, Pa.
Steve Doberstein P’79, Feb. 21, Wilmington, Del.
Donald Roberts, Dec. 18, Glen Mills, Pa.
DO
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Encourage Admitted Students
The Personal Touch
This was not an ordinary spring for Dean of Admissions Kevin Mathes ’07 and his office.
On March 30, Mathes and his team launched B2B: Bison to Bison, an online network where admitted students can connect with one another, post questions for current students and learn more about why Bucknell is the right choice. Think of it as an admitted-student day that lasts for months.

Bucknell built it, and the admitted students and their families have come. Within weeks of launch, the B2B network had grown to more than 2,000 active users per week.

Bucknell students standing on a wall with spirit signs
Photos: Emily Paine
CONTINUING CONNECTIONS

To ensure safety of alumni and friends during the COVID-19 pandemic, the in-person, on-campus Reunion Weekend celebration was canceled. In its place, our Virtual Reunion, May 29–30, brought together about 500 alumni from around the world. Participants spanned class years from 1945 to 2015, including graduation years ending with 0 or 5 and all emeritus classes. Highlights included updates from President John Bravman and the college deans, a campus tour, educational sessions with faculty and alumni experts, articles by alumni celebrating a Reunion year, a service of remembrance and more. Additional special events included live gatherings on Zoom for Reunion volunteers, LGBTQA alumni, Black alumni and Reunion classes celebrating their 5th to 55th years.

Four alumni were recognized for their careers and contributions to Bucknell and society. A committee of current and past Bucknell University Alumni Association Board members, Bucknell Club representatives and previous recipients chose the winners:

  • Loyalty to Bucknell: Scott Nichols ’70, P’03
  • Outstanding Achievement in a Chosen Profession:
    Daniel Atkins III ’65
  • Service to Humanity: Ruth Kauffman ’85
  • Young Alumni: Molly Burke ’10
For more about the award recipients go.bucknell.edu/2020AlumniAwards
Bucknell digital magazine
View recordings of the highlights
https://web.cvent.com/event/
Witty Winners
Here are our favorite caption submissions from the last issue:
“With all of the rules up on the wall, this is the best I’ve got: a blank page!”
Karl Frank ’87
“Page 1 of my early decision application to Bucknell done.”
Rick Gross P’23
“This just in: ‘Coronavirus Lockdown Fuels Coiffure Crisis’ ”
Brooks Sheifer ’69
“Hoarders plundered all of the Charmin rolls from the shelves? It’s time for Plan B.”
Bill Gross ’65
“Isn’t there an app for this?”
Amy Gray Grimm ’90
Submit your caption for the retro photo on Page 61 to bmagazine@bucknell.edu or facebook.com/bucknellu by Aug. 3.
Vintage photograph of a woman by a type writer
Photo: Special Collections/University Archives
 My Favorite Thing graphic
Photos: Courtesy of Makoto Fujimura ’83, P’13, Sanh Tran
" "
Richard Rinehart, Samek Art Museum director (above), conceived the Community Art Wall. Mako Fujimura ’83, P’13 offered two works for the wall. At top is one, a painting from his Oribe Series. Listen to Fujimura talk about the role of art during challenging times: go.bucknell.edu/FujimuraSamek
The Community Art Wall

" "When the statewide lockdown shuttered the Samek Art Museum because of the COVID-19 outbreak, Director RICHARD RINEHART remembered another tragedy — 9/11. It occurred the day of a grand art opening he’d planned while working at a California museum. Hesitantly, he carried on, doubting many people would attend the evening event. That’s when he learned people crave art during times of fear and isolation. People came for the art because they “didn’t want to be alone,” he says.

Photos: Courtesy of Makoto Fujimura ’83, P’13, Sanh Tran
" "
Richard Rinehart, Samek Art Museum director (above), conceived the Community Art Wall. Mako Fujimura ’83, P’13 offered two works for the wall. At top is one, a painting from his Oribe Series. Listen to Fujimura talk about the role of art during challenging times: go.bucknell.edu/FujimuraSamek
Photos: Courtesy of Makoto Fujimura ’83, P’13, Sanh Tran
" "
Richard Rinehart, Samek Art Museum director (above), conceived the Community Art Wall. Mako Fujimura ’83, P’13 offered two works for the wall. At top is one, a painting from his Oribe Series. Listen to Fujimura talk about the role of art during challenging times: go.bucknell.edu/FujimuraSamek
The Community Art Wall

" "When the statewide lockdown shuttered the Samek Art Museum because of the COVID-19 outbreak, Director RICHARD RINEHART remembered another tragedy — 9/11. It occurred the day of a grand art opening he’d planned while working at a California museum. Hesitantly, he carried on, doubting many people would attend the evening event. That’s when he learned people crave art during times of fear and isolation. People came for the art because they “didn’t want to be alone,” he says.

Construction workers install the final beam atop the new Freeman College of Management/Art & Art History Building, set to open in 2021.

photograph by EMILY PAINE

Construction workers
Construction workers install the final beam atop the new Freeman College of Management/Art & Art History Building, set to open in 2021.

photograph by EMILY PAINE

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Thanks for reading our Summer 2020 issue!